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jean-bertrand aristide

Jean Bertrand Aristide return from Exile, October 5, 1994

Jean Bertrand Aristide return from Exile, October 5, 1994

Here is the return of Jean Bertrand Aristide from Exile, October 5, 1994 with 20,000 US troops to bolster his new administration.

Aristide, the first democratically elected President with 67% supports, was ousted from power by a September 30, 1991 military coup, because his initiated reforms angered the military and Haiti's elite. When the coup regime collapsed in 1994 under US pressure, following a huge peaceful public demonstration of Aristide supporters (about 250,000 people) in New York, urging the U.S President Bill Clinton to deliver on his election promise to return Aristide to Haiti, the U.S and other international communities, including the UN Security Council, persuaded the military regime to let Aristide return to power. On October 15, 1994, President Aristide returned to Haiti to complete his term in President's office.

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February 29, 2004, Jean-Bertrand Aristide forced into exile

February 29, 2004, Jean-Bertrand Aristide forced into exile

These pictures show Jean Bertrand Aristide arriving at Bangui M'Poko International Airport which is an international airport located northwest of Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic, following his second exile from Haiti.

The second set shows Jean Bertrand Aristis, his wife Mildred Aristide and their two children Christine and Michaelle Aristide arriving in South Africa where he would be allowed to live in exile until he can safely return to Haiti.

For the second coup D'Etat given to Jean Bertrand Aristide, not so much as individuals but rather countries are accused. On February 29, 2004, the US, France and Canada are accused to be the masters behind the overthrew of Jean Bertrand Aristide government.

Following several weeks of conflicts, Jean-Bertrand Aristide was ousted in a 2004 Haitian coup d'état in which one of his former soldiers (Guy Philippe) took the leading role. However, Aristide accused the U.S as one of the accomplices for orchestrating the coup d'état against him with support from Jamaican Prime Minister P. J. Patterson and countries like France, Canada and some others. On 25 February, 2004, Guy Philippe and rebel forces surrounded Port-au-Prince and announced plans to arrest Aristide. On 29 February, 2004, Aristide resigned as President and left Haiti with his wife on board a U.S. military plane to the Central African Republic. In an interview on CNN, on March 2, 2004, he said he was told to resign to avoid bloodshed. He later claimed that, his departure was a kidnapping, accusing the U.S. for orchestrating a coup d'état against him.

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Did Jean Bertrand Aristide support violence and Pe Lebrun in Haiti

Did Jean Bertrand Aristide support violence and Pe Lebrun in Haiti

Here are some of the statements made during a speech given by former Haitian President Jean Bertrand Aristide on September 27, 1991. Do you think that the speech promotes violence and the use of Pè Lebrun by the Haitian population?

Aristide was without equal when it comes to popularity among the people. He won the nation's first democratic election in December 1990 with 67% votes. However, he was caught between plots by the Duvalierists with country's wealthy elites. On Friday, September 27 1991, he delivered a speech, activating the common people against the wealthy elites and power mongers of the country. This speech is famously known as "Aristide's Famous Pe Lebrun Speech" and as a consequence, on September 29, 1991, Aristide was overthrown, just two days after delivering the speech. In every protest in Haiti, the protesters often burn tires. Pere Lebrun was the name of a former tire manufacturer and a major retailer of automobile tires in Haiti. 'Pe leburn' is a nickname of burning tires. In his eight months in president's office, Aristide alienated many civil servants, attempted to undermine the country's military forces and challenged the authority responsible to draft the constitution. He publicly distinguished the elites between patriotic elite and the 'patripoch' (pocket-stuffing) elite.

Aristide's supporters, following the historic speech on September 27, intimidated the news media that Aristide would legitimize his speech. He would place burning tires around the necks of the suspected opponents and burn them to death. However, very few historians have had the opportunity to hear and understand this historic speech live on September 27th which is often considered as his best speech delivered so far. It is a fact that there is no proof anywhere that suggests Aristide's policy was to urge people to burn people. Rather, when he came to power in 1991, unlike his predecessors, he tried to bring more issues and people under the rule of law. There are many Haitians who think that Aristide was unfairly treated. He was demonized by wealthy Haitians who own 90% of Haiti's wealth and act as overseers for empire. Aristide denounced the evil schemes of these imperialists and their agents in the Haitian oligarchy.

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Haiti in Flame following Jean-Bertrand Aristide departure to Exile

Haiti in Flame following Jean-Bertrand Aristide departure to Exile

Here are some pictures taken following the departure of Jean-Bertrand Aristide to Exile.

One study found that, following the departure of Aristide in 2004, about 8,000 people in Port-au-Prince alone were murdered and over 35,000 sexually assaulted. Armed rebels and angry partisans took control of half the country. In a news conference, Prime Minister Yvon Neptune said, President Aristide resigned to avoid further violence and bloodbath. We might remember that in connection with the resignation and departure of Aristide, about 44 Lavalas opponents were killed in the town of Saint-Marc. Seven people were arrested, including former Prime Minister Yvon Neptune and former Interior Minister and present interim President Jocelerme Privert. However, Yvon Neptune objected to the term 'massacre', because he considered "that was a fight between two different sides. Ramicose, which was an organization close to the opposition, fought with Bale Wouze, which was a popular organization belonging to Lavalas. Since no proper evidence was found, none of the accused was convicted.

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Mildred, Christine and Michaelle Aristide arriving in South Africa

Mildred, Christine and Michaelle Aristide arriving in South Africa

Here is a picture of Jean Bertrand Aristide, Mildred, Christine and Michaelle Aristide arriving in South Africa.

When Haiti's beleaguered President Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigned following a coup d'état, and fled into exile for a second time on Sunday, 29 February 2004, he left the impoverished nation in a chaos. The former Catholic priest was once hailed by the masses as their savior. Aristide later accused the U.S as one of the accomplices for orchestrating the coup d'état against him with support from Jamaican Prime Minister P. J. Patterson and countries like France, Canada and some others.

Aristide's enforced departure created a vacuum. Hundreds of gunmen, most of whom were his supporters, and other rebel leaders, outlaws, poured on to the streets of the capital. About 100 U.S. Marines arrived on the night of departure and Canada, France and several Caribbean nations also agreed to send troops to restore law and order in the country. The outstation of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide in February 2004 left a large number of 9 mm weapons, 38's, American-style machine guns, M-14's and hand grenades in the hands of his supporters and other hooligans. As a consequence of this, regular exchange of ammunition among the gangs and with the UN peacekeeping force was a routine matter.

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Jean-Bertrand Aristide, Mildred Aristide, Christine Aristide, Michaelle Aristide

Jean-Bertrand Aristide, Mildred Aristide, Christine Aristide, Michaelle Aristide

Here is the former Haitian president with his family. Jean-Bertrand Aristide wife Mildred with their children Christine and Michaelle.

One of the accomplishments of Jean Bertrand Aristide and the Lavalas administration is that the country say a drastic increase in the number of schools in the country. Jean Bertrand Aristide and Rene Preval built 195 new primary schools and 104 secondary schools.
His government was also credited for providing thousands of scholarships so that children could afford to attend schools. During the government of Jean Bertrand Aristide the percentage of children enrolled in primary school education rose to 72%.

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Jean Bertrand Aristide, 1995 Je veux et Je peux

Jean Bertrand Aristide, 1995 Je veux et Je peux

Here is a statement considered to be one of the most famous. In a speech given in 1995, President Jean Bertrand Aristide being very upset of gun violence in the sociery stated: I order that the removal of guns in the streets of Haiti be complete and legal. From now on, regardless of the vehicle that passes doing a drive by shooting, that all the other vehicles bolck the traffic to block these individuals. I am the head of state, responsible for the security of each Haitian and I want, and I can and I want, and I want.

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Jean-Bertrand Aristide Wants To Return To Haiti

Jean-Bertrand Aristide Wants To Return To Haiti

Here is a picture of former Haitian president Jean-Bertrand after he was exiled to South Africa

Here it is my friend, as it was expected, Jean-Bertrand Aristide wands to go back to his country as well. On January 19, 2010, three days after the surprise return of Jean-Claude Duvalier in Haiti, Aristide wants the same treatment.

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Rene Preval - Yvon Neptune - Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Rene Preval - Yvon Neptune - Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Here is a picture of three popular Haitian political personalities. Rene Preval and Yvon Neptune were both prime minister under the government of Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Rene preval ended up doing two terms as president while Yvon Neptune ended up in Jail. Aristide for his part went on exile in South Africa

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Alvin P. Adams Jr. , key figure during Jean-Bertrand Aristide reign, died

Alvin P. Adams Jr. , key figure during Jean-Bertrand Aristide reign, died

Here is the picture of Alvin P. Adams Jr. who passed away this week.

Alvin P. Adams Jr. (73), a key Figure during Jean-Bertrand Aristide rule and an Ambassador who helped Haiti pursue democracy, died of a heart attack on October 10, 2015, at his home in Portland, Ore. Alvin P. Adams Jr., was an American envoy to Haiti (1989 to 1992) and champion of human rights, but he would be more remembered for his contributory role during the government of Jean Bertrand Aristide and his negotiation in the 1990s with Lt. General Prosper Avril. Gen. Avril was a Haitian military ruler and a protégé of the ousted dictators Francois Duvalier and his son, Jean-Claude Duvalier; Avril had to leave Haiti ultimately on a United States Air Force jet like his predecessor. His departure paved the way for a provisional civilian replacement and, later that year, the government of Jean-Bertrand Aristide, Haiti's first freely elected president and a Roman Catholic priest. When a military coup overthrew Aristide from power within the same year, Alvin Adams again played a key role in negotiating his exile to Venezuela. Jean Bertrand came back to power in 1994.

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