ADVERTISEMENT


President Leaving

Francois Duvalier transfers power to his son Jean Claude Duvalier

Francois Duvalier transfers power to his son Jean Claude Duvalier

Here is a picture of Francois Duvalier as he was transferring power to his son Jean Claude Duvalier.

François Duvalier was the President of Haiti from 1957 until his death (22 October 1957 - 21 April 1971). Unlike other Haitian chief executives, he ruled his country using extreme violence (causing nearly 30,000 deaths) and phony elections to hold down any opposition. To consolidate his power, he reduced the size of the army and, with his chief aide, Clément Barbot, organized a private army "the Tontons Macoutes" (Bogeymen). In 1959, when he was stricken by a heart attack, Barbot acted in his stead. However, upon recovery, Duvalier (Papa Doc, because he was trained as a physician) promptly imprisoned his aide Barbot. He took the title of "President for Life" in 1964 and remained in power until he died in 1971. On Duvalier's death, power was transferred to his son 19-year-old Jean-Claude ("Baby Doc") who succeeded him as president and Jean-Claude Duvalier, became the second-generation "President for Life".

Permalink | Comments

February 29, 2004, Jean-Bertrand Aristide forced into exile

February 29, 2004, Jean-Bertrand Aristide forced into exile

These pictures show Jean Bertrand Aristide arriving at Bangui M'Poko International Airport which is an international airport located northwest of Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic, following his second exile from Haiti.

The second set shows Jean Bertrand Aristis, his wife Mildred Aristide and their two children Christine and Michaelle Aristide arriving in South Africa where he would be allowed to live in exile until he can safely return to Haiti.

For the second coup D'Etat given to Jean Bertrand Aristide, not so much as individuals but rather countries are accused. On February 29, 2004, the US, France and Canada are accused to be the masters behind the overthrew of Jean Bertrand Aristide government.

Following several weeks of conflicts, Jean-Bertrand Aristide was ousted in a 2004 Haitian coup d'état in which one of his former soldiers (Guy Philippe) took the leading role. However, Aristide accused the U.S as one of the accomplices for orchestrating the coup d'état against him with support from Jamaican Prime Minister P. J. Patterson and countries like France, Canada and some others. On 25 February, 2004, Guy Philippe and rebel forces surrounded Port-au-Prince and announced plans to arrest Aristide. On 29 February, 2004, Aristide resigned as President and left Haiti with his wife on board a U.S. military plane to the Central African Republic. In an interview on CNN, on March 2, 2004, he said he was told to resign to avoid bloodshed. He later claimed that, his departure was a kidnapping, accusing the U.S. for orchestrating a coup d'état against him.

Permalink | Comments

Haiti in Flame following Jean-Bertrand Aristide departure to Exile

Haiti in Flame following Jean-Bertrand Aristide departure to Exile

Here are some pictures taken following the departure of Jean-Bertrand Aristide to Exile.

One study found that, following the departure of Aristide in 2004, about 8,000 people in Port-au-Prince alone were murdered and over 35,000 sexually assaulted. Armed rebels and angry partisans took control of half the country. In a news conference, Prime Minister Yvon Neptune said, President Aristide resigned to avoid further violence and bloodbath. We might remember that in connection with the resignation and departure of Aristide, about 44 Lavalas opponents were killed in the town of Saint-Marc. Seven people were arrested, including former Prime Minister Yvon Neptune and former Interior Minister and present interim President Jocelerme Privert. However, Yvon Neptune objected to the term 'massacre', because he considered "that was a fight between two different sides. Ramicose, which was an organization close to the opposition, fought with Bale Wouze, which was a popular organization belonging to Lavalas. Since no proper evidence was found, none of the accused was convicted.

Permalink | Comments

General Raoul Cedras going into exile

General Raoul Cedras going into exile

General Raoul Cédras going into exile.

The coup of Haitian military that ousted Jean Aristide from his rightful office in 1991 was led by Army Lieutenant General Raoul Cedras. Between 30 September 1991 and 15 June 1993, the real political authority in Haiti rested with the military junta headed by Raoul Cédras and Michel François. During this period, the American military officers and civilian officials provided lucrative contracts to several wealthy Haitian families who were behind the coup or backed the three-year military regime. The U.S offered Raoul Cedras a million dollar-plus "golden parachute benefit" plus good compensation for his three houses, to resign and go into exile. However, Raoul delayed his departure for a much better deal. Cédras was a member of the US-trained Leopard Corps; he was chosen by the US and France to be in charge of security for the Haitian general election, 1990-1991 and he subsequently became Commander-in-Chief of the army of Jean-Bertrand Aristide. He was also one important source for the CIA, providing reports critical of President Aristide. With United States intervention, Gen Raoul Cedras agreed to resign on 10 October 1994, paving the way for Aristide's return. To avoid arrest, Cedras fled to Panama on October 13, 1994.

Permalink | Comments

Jean Claude Duvalier and Michele Bennett going into exile

Jean Claude Duvalier and Michele Bennett going into exile

Here is a picture of Jean Claude Duvalier and Michele Bennett as they are leaving Haiti to go into exile.

Although Jean-Claude Duvalier (Baby Doc), replaced a few older cabinet members with younger men, instituted budgetary and judicial reforms, released press censorship, released some political prisoners, he had ruled the country with a bloody brutality. He was a hedonist who always strives to maximize pleasure. When political repression and a worsening economy set off violent unrest and a series of riots broke out across Haiti, fearing for life, Duvalier fled to France on a temporary asylum on 7 February 1986 in a U.S cargo plane accompanying his family and 17 associates. When France rejected his appeal for political asylum and asked him to find another place of refuge, he found no other country to accept him. On 27 May 1980, Duvalier married Michèle Bennett Pasquet in a record extravagance manner. With his divorce from Michel in 1993, he lost most of his wealth and had to live a modest life in his remaining part of exile. However, he had supporters who founded the François Duvalier Foundation in 2006 and they used to promote the positive aspects of the Duvalier presidency while he was in exile. On 16 January 2011, during the presidential election campaign, Baby Doc came back to Haiti after 25 years of exile. He announced that, his return is not to join politics, but to help to reconstruct the country. He died in his home of a heart attack on October 4, 2014.

Permalink | Comments

Michel Martelly cries as he spends Final moments in Office

Michel Martelly cries as he spends Final moments in Office

Here is a picture of President Michel Martelly crying as he spent hi final moments in Office as President of Haiti.

President Michel Martelly made his 20- minute farewell address to the Haitians while leaving his office on February 7, 2016. In his speech before the parliament, he said one of his biggest regrets was that the presidential election could not be completed. He thanked those who accompanied him, defended his family against accusations of embezzlement. He said, people will remember that once there was a certain Michel Joseph Martelly who loved, gave, and built. He has worked night and day for the country and is ready to answer before the court of history. During the final moments in the office, he became emotional; drops of tears were shining in his eyes.

Permalink | Comments

Michel Martelly, Discours d'adieu a la Nation

Michel Martelly, Discours d'adieu a la Nation

On February 7, 2016, President Michel Joseph Martelly made a twenty minute farewell speech to the nation. Addressing the Haitian people he has said, since the moment he took his office on May 14, 2011, he had worked 'night and day' to improve the country for the Haitian people. His biggest regret was the postponement of presidential election. He has justified his every act with the statement that he is ready to answer before the court of history. February 7th, 2016, was the end of his constitutional term of 5 years as the President of the Republic. He thanked Haitian people for entrusting him the great responsibility to hold the state's highest office. In his farewell speech, he insisted that he was leaving office to contribute to constitutional normalcy. On early Saturday, he shifted power to Prime Minister Evans Paul in an effort to stop unruly street protests and avoid a dangerous power vacuum.

Permalink | Comments

Jean Claude Duvalier and Michele Bennett on the way to exile

Jean Claude Duvalier and Michele Bennett on the way to exile

Here is a picture of Former Haitian Dictator Jean Claude Duvalier and wife Michele Bennett Duvalier as they are leaving Haiti on their way to their exile in France

Furor Erupts over Duvalier Funeral Plans

A citizens' activist group is against deceased former dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier being honored with a state funeral. They have begun a petition to stop Martelly from following protocol that necessitates a former president be given national honors.

The petitioners find holding a state funeral for Jean-Claude the white washing of ". . . the legacy of Duvalier's regime, and . . . of his father . . . Francois . . . Duvalier before him . . ."

Permalink | Comments

President Daniel Fignole escorted out of the country

President Daniel Fignole escorted out of the country

Here is a picture of President Daniel Fignole as he is escorted out of the country. This took place following a Coup DEtat where President Daniel Fignole was obligated to leave Haiti.

Daniel Fignole became Haiti's provisional head of state for a period of three weeks in 1957.
He was at the head of a liberal labor organizer. Born in the coastal town of Pestel to a poor family, he moved to Port-au-Prince in 1927 at age 14 to continue his education. Following his education, Daniel Fignole started his professional career as he was tutoring the children of Haiti's wealthy elite.

Permalink | Comments