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Removal of presidential sash from Michel Martelly

Removal of presidential sash from Michel Martelly

Here is a picture of the ceremony for the removal of presidential sash from President Michel Martelly.

On Sunday, February 7, 2016, Michel Martelly made his farewell speech to the nation as he left his office without any replacement. His day of departure coincidentally became the first day of Port-au-Prince's annual three-day Carnival celebration, which was called off as violent protests erupted in many places. It was as well as the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Duvalier dictatorship. Martelly left the country in the hands of a disputed interim government amid one of the worst political crises in recent years-- and without a president. However, an agreement for a transitional government was reached just twenty two hours before Martelly left his office. To symbolize his departure, Martelly returned the presidential sash to the National Assembly by handing it over to the then National Assembly President Jocelerme Privert.

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Michel Martelly returning presidential sash to National Assembly

Michel Martelly returning presidential sash to National Assembly

Here is a picture of President Michel Martelly as he was returning the presidential sash to the National Assembly.

On February 7, 2016, the former President Martelly to symbolize his departure, returned the presidential sash to the National Assembly by handing it over to the then National Assembly President Jocelerme Privert. The presidential sash is an important symbol of the continuity of the presidency, designed to resemble the nation's flag, or the country's national colors and symbols, especially those of Latin American presidents. Its value as a symbol of the office of the head of state can be compared to that of a crown in monarchies. To symbolize a change, Jean-Bertrand Aristide as a new President chose a peasant woman to put the Presidential sash on him. The next morning, President Aristide served breakfast to hundreds of homeless people and street kids at the National Palace.

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Jocelerme Privert and Michel Martelly

Jocelerme Privert and Michel Martelly

Here is a picture of two haitian Presidents Jocelerme Privert and Michel Martelly.

Less than 24 hours before the scheduled departure of Martelly, the Haitian leaders were able to manage and find a consensus for a short-term provisional government necessary to hold the postponed presidential and legislative runoff. However, such consensus was arrived by overruling the Haitian constitution on deals between the executive and legislature; the agreement was signed by Martelly, Privert, and the Speaker of the House and it was brokered by the OAS members. As the ruling Senate Chief, Jocelerme had also played a central role in those discussions. Recently, Privert has told the Associated Press that a new electoral council will be created soon to ensure that the postponed runoff is held within the scheduled time frame in a fair and transparent manner.

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Jocelerme Privert took oath of office as new Provisional President of Haiti

Jocelerme Privert took oath of office as new Provisional President of Haiti

Here is a picture of Jocelerme Privert on the night of February 13 to 14, 2016 taking the oath of office as new Provisional President of Haiti.

On 14 February 2016, Jocelerme Privert (February 1, 1954) was elected by the Haitian politicians as the interim Haitian President to fill the vacuum after departure of former President Michel Martelly on February 7, 2016. His other contenders for the post were Edgard Leblanc Fils and Dejean Bélizaire. Privert received 77 votes (13 Senate + 64 Lower House) to defeat Leblanc with 56 votes (10 + 46) *. Bélizaire received only 2 votes. On February 14, the parliament of Haiti met in the National Assembly and elected Jocelerme Privert as the interim president.

Earlier, before the departure of Martelly, an agreement was signed with the proposition that the interim President will hold his office for 120 days and remain responsible to organize the overdue presidential election on April 24, 2016 and install a new President on May 14, 2016. Overruling the Haitian constitution on deals between the executive and legislature, the agreement was signed by Martelly, Privert, and the Speaker of the House and it was brokered by the OAS members.

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Ertha Pascal-Trouillot, First Haitian Woman President

Ertha Pascal-Trouillot, First Haitian Woman President

The first woman in Haitian history to become President, Ertha Pascal-Trouillot was born in August 1943. She became provisional President of Haiti in 1990 as she was chief justice at the time. She attended school at Lycée François Duvalier and was mentored by Ernst Trouillot who became her husband
Erta Pascal-Trouillot was a teenager when Duvalier took power and became the first woman justice of the Supreme Court of Haiti as a result of her excelling in school.

Pascal-Trouillot became interim president of Haiti, March 13, 1990; left office February 7, 1991, for duly elected president, Rev. Jean-Bertrand Aristide

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Rene Preval - Yvon Neptune - Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Rene Preval - Yvon Neptune - Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Here is a picture of three popular Haitian political personalities. Rene Preval and Yvon Neptune were both prime minister under the government of Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Rene preval ended up doing two terms as president while Yvon Neptune ended up in Jail. Aristide for his part went on exile in South Africa

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Jean Bertrand Aristide and Raoul Cedras

Jean Bertrand Aristide and Raoul Cedras

Here is a picture of Former Haitian President with General Raoul Cedras.

Haitian military leader Joseph Raoul Cedras was born in Jeremie and American-educated. He rose to prominence as a soldier in the Leopard Corps, trained under U.S. forces. The U.S. and France, impressed by his leadership skills, selected him to head security in Haiti's 1990-1991 state and local elections. Jean-Bertrand Aristide won his bid for the presidency and chose Cedras as Commander-in-Chief of the Haitian army, Cedras also retaining the position of Lieutenant General.

Meanwhile the U.S. was threatening to invade Haiti unless they could persuade Jonassaint to leave office. Jonassaint complied. Cedras by this point was a nationally feared figure, responsible for the massacres of 3,000-plus men, women, and children while in power.

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Joseph Nerette and Joseph Raoul Cedras

Joseph Nerette and Joseph Raoul Cedras

Here is a picture Joseph Nérette and Joseph Raoul Cédras.

Following the rule of the leader of the Haitian Military Junta, Raoul Cédras, Haiti's 48th President, a post which was appointed illegally, and after the 1991 ousting of President Aristide, Joseph Nérette began a term of office as the country's provisional president. A former judge, Justice of the Supreme Court, and fixture on the political scene, Nérette would keep the post from October 8, 1991 to June 19, 1992. His death in 2007 at the age of 83 after a battle with lung cancer was well talked about.

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Haitian President Rene Preval

Haitian President Rene Preval

Born in Marmelade, Haiti Rene Garcia Preval is the son of a Haitian agronomist who has risen to the position of Minister of Agriculture under Paul E. Magloire.

Rene Preval was the Prime Minister of Haiti under the government of Jean-Bertrand Aristide. He married three time. On December 6, 2009 Preval married Elizabeth Delatour

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Michel Martelly Sophia Martelly, President Rene Preval, Elizabeth Debrosse Delatour

Michel Martelly Sophia Martelly, President Rene Preval, Elizabeth Debrosse Delatour

Here is a picture of the inauguration. President Michel Martelly and his wife Sophia Martelly, President Rene Preval and his wife Elizabeth Debrosse Delatour

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