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Richard Nixon and Pat visit to Paul E. Magloire in Haiti

Richard Nixon and Pat visit to Paul E. Magloire in Haiti

Here is a picture of Vice President Richard Nixon of the United States and his wife Thelma Catherine "Pat" Nixon during a visit to Haiti in 1955. President Paul Magloire was accompanied with his wife, Yolette Leconte Magloire.

When former U.S President Richard Nixon visited Haiti back in 1955 along with his wife Thelma Catherine "Pat" Nixon, he was acting in the capacity of Vice President of U.S and Haiti was under the leadership of ruler Paul Magloire. On March 3, 1955, following the formal presentation of the Cabinet to Vice President Nixon at the Palace, the Vice President attended a conference on the request of Haitian President Magloire. Richard Nixon was accompanied by some dignitaries like Assistant Secretary of State Holland, the American Ambassador, the Haitian Ambassador to the United States and Mr. Robert Newbegin. M. Mauclair Zéphirin, Secretary of State for Foreign Relations, acted as interpreter.

During the conference, Nixon expressed his deep concern because the International Bank had indicated that the maximum loan it could make to Haiti would be in the sum of two million dollars. He also mentioned that before the visit of International Bank representative in Haiti one year ago in 1954, he was very optimistic about the loan amount. He thought that sanctioned amount would be enough to cover the cost of constructing a highway from Port-au-Prince to Aux Cayes at an estimated cost of seven million dollars. He said he is very hopeful on the outcome of the negotiations of a loan from the Export-Import Bank for the Artibonite dam and irrigation project; it is proceeding satisfactorily and expecting a quick announcement (On April 20, 1955, the Export-Import Bank authorized a $7 million additional loan to Haiti for the flood control and irrigation project in the Artibonite River Valley).

Without making any promise, the Vice President remained very attentive in discussion, made some inquiries to clarify statements made by President Magloire, discussed on different dimensions on the program and activities of the FOA in Haiti, appreciated few ongoing Haitian projects such as irrigation projects in the Aux Cayes area, Ambassador Nixon expressed his wish that a grant-in-aid should be provided to assist Haiti in its economic rehabilitation made necessary by the Hurricane Hazel.

Starting with the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt in 1901, 14 different United States presidents have made a total of 36 visits to the Caribbean. Fourteen (14) Caribbean countries have had at least one visit, with the most visited countries being Bermuda with eight (8) visits, the Bahamas with six (6), Trinidad & Tobago with five (5), and Jamaica with four (4) visits. Franklin D. Roosevelt made the most trips (14) either on vacation or while involved with Allied diplomatic interactions during World War II. Of the 13 sovereign countries in the region, four--Dominica, the Dominican Republic, Saint Kitts and Nevis, and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines--have not as of yet been visited by an American president. Haiti has been visited by 3 U.S. Presidents so far:

Calvin Coolidge, July 5-6, 1934 Haiti Cap Haitien: Informal visit en route to a vacation in Hawaii
Bill Clinton March 31, 1995: Haiti Port-au-Prince Attended transition ceremony for United Nations Mission in Haiti
Former U.S. Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton's first joint visit to Haiti in 2010 after the earthquake

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Little Haiti Business and Cultural District, Flatbush New York

Little Haiti Business and Cultural District, Flatbush New York

Little Haiti of New York, spanning a large portions of Flatbush and Nostrand Avenues, from Parkside Avenue to Avenue H in New York City has been officially designated. This section of Brooklyn where generations after generations of Haitians have landed has been finally designated. We can all say that there is now a Little Haiti In Flatbush and another one in Miami, Florida.

June, 2018: Haitian-Americans gathered in Flatbush street corner to celebrate the creation of "Little Haiti Business and Cultural District.". The area was previously designated "Little Caribbean"

As per news dated June 5, 2018, after years of meetings and planning, the New York City Council announced a ceremonial resolution to name a certain section of Flatbush "Little Haiti." Rodneyse Bichotte, State Senator Kevin Parker, and Councilmember Jumaane Williams, along with local organizations and community members are among the spearheads to designate a part of Flatbush as the Little Haiti Cultural & Business District.

However, according to Rodneyse Bichotte, who is the first Haitian-American to be elected to the State Legislature from New York City, although the Haitian community supports the designation of both 'Little Haiti' and 'Little Caribbean,' "the decision to name Flatbush Avenue 'Little Caribbean' was done without enough community support or involvement."

The proposal generated support mostly from Haitian communities like the Haitian American Caucus, Haitian American Business Network Chamber of Commerce and Haiti Cultural Exchange. Even the move of Bichotte and a host of other elected officials and activists to name "Little Haiti" has been met with criticism and termed as "misguided" and one of "division."

In an email to Bichotte, a host of some elected officials, including Council Member Mathieu Eugene and Rep. Yvette D. Clark, Ernest Skinner, a local community organizer and activist, have asked, "When did Haiti stop being part of the Caribbean? Sowing division may be why Haiti has never been able to reach its full potential."
The designation for "Little Caribbean" was initiated by Flatbush native Shelley Worrell, founder of CaribBEING, a local non-profit cultural institution founded in 1999. CaribBEING celebrates Caribbean heritage in the rapidly gentrifying neighborhood of Flatbush, Brooklyn. She is a longtime supporter of the Little Caribbean and she is trying to preserve and celebrate Caribbean food, culture and small businesses in this area. Shelly bought a shipping container and turned it into a pop-up art space. She transformed every inch of her container with the feel of a breezy, beachside Caribbean aura.

In a statement Bichotte has said that Haiti has had a unique position within the Caribbean -- it is geographically in the Caribbean, but not of the Caribbean. History has created its distinct identity which is why Haitians have had to build separate communities and organizations in order to survive.

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Paul E. Magloire addresses joint session of congress with Richard Nixon

Paul E. Magloire addresses joint session of congress with Richard Nixon

Haitian President Paul E. Magloire addresses a joint session of U.S. congress in 1955. He is being supported by U.S. Vice President Richard Nixon and House Speaker

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Juneteenth Independence Day or Freedom Day

Juneteenth Independence Day or Freedom Day

Juneteenth is an American holiday that commemorates June 19, 1865, announcement of the abolition of slavery in the U.S. It is called Independence Day or Freedom Day. This was the day recognized as the emancipation of enslaved African-Americans throughout the former Confederacy of the southern United States.

President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on September 22, 1862, during the American Civil War, declaring that all enslaved people in the Confederate States of America in rebellion and not in Union hands were to be freed. The States that were not part of this agreement included: Kentucky, Maryland, Delaware, Missouri, West Virginia, the state of Tennessee, lower Louisiana, and Southeast Virginia.

The newly free slaves soon learned that their fight for freedom did not end with the Emancipation Proclamation. In the early 20th century, economic and political power led to a decline in Juneteenth. Later, between 1890 and 1908, all former Confederate states passed new constitutions or amendments that effectively disenfranchised black people and excluded them from the political process. It was during this period that the White-dominated state legislatures passed Jim Crow laws imposing second-class status. Then came the Great Depression that made many black people to leave the farms and to look toward the major cities in search of work. The Second Great Migration of Black Americans started during World War II, when many black people migrated to the West Coast where there were many job openings in the defense industry.

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The flags of Haiti and the United States of America

The flags of Haiti and the United States of America

Here is a picture of the flags of Haiti and the United States of America.

According to a 2012 U.S. Global Leadership Report, 79% of Haitians approve of U.S. leadership, while 18% disapprove and 3% are uncertain. It is the highest rating for any surveyed country in the Americas. Haiti has maintained a long-standing relationship with the United States, because it was Haiti's primary trading partner for exports and imports, the primary target of Haitian emigration and the most important source of foreign assistance. The U.S. has been Haiti's largest donor since 1973. Between FY 1995 and FY 2003, the U.S. contributed more than $850 million in assistance to Haiti. Since 2004, the U.S. has provided over $600 million for improving governance in Haiti. One of the reasons for the U.S's interest in Haiti arose chiefly because of Haiti's proximity to the Panama Canal and Central America, controlling Windward Passage that could disrupt maritime traffic. In August 1989, President George Bush restored US$10 million in food aid to Avril government. Following the 2010 earthquake, with the U.S. and international supports, Haiti has seen a steady recovery. The U.S had provided more than $4.5 billion of assistance to Haiti to support its life-saving post-disaster relief as well as long-term recovery, reconstruction, and development programs. U.S. taxpayers have contributed some $33 million for impoverished Haiti to hold elections during this cycle. Haiti's transition to a strong democracy is always important to the United States. The flags of Haiti and the U.S will flutter together.

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U.S. Senators David Perdue, Marco Rubio and Johnny Isakson want sanctions on Haiti

U.S. Senators David Perdue, Marco Rubio and Johnny Isakson want sanctions on Haiti

Here is the pictures of three U.S. Senators. It is David Perdue, Marco Rubio and Johnny Isakson and they all want sanctions on Haiti.

As per news dated April 21, 2016, three U.S. Senators David Perdue (R-GA), Johnny Isakson (R-GA), and Marco Rubio (R-FL) have expressed their growing concern with the political situation in Haiti and have urged the U.S Secretary of State John Kerry, in a letter dated April 15, 2016, to use every tool at his disposal to ensure Haitian authority works closely with the Interim President Privert and the new CEP and completes its presidential elections process by the agreed upon deadline by April 24, 2016. The authority must punish those who plan to disrupt the election for their own interest. The election as a whole has cost about $80 million in which the United Stated had invested more than $30 million and a lot of diplomatic effort.

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February 29, 2004, Jean-Bertrand Aristide forced into exile

February 29, 2004, Jean-Bertrand Aristide forced into exile

These pictures show Jean Bertrand Aristide arriving at Bangui M'Poko International Airport which is an international airport located northwest of Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic, following his second exile from Haiti.

The second set shows Jean Bertrand Aristis, his wife Mildred Aristide and their two children Christine and Michaelle Aristide arriving in South Africa where he would be allowed to live in exile until he can safely return to Haiti.

For the second coup D'Etat given to Jean Bertrand Aristide, not so much as individuals but rather countries are accused. On February 29, 2004, the US, France and Canada are accused to be the masters behind the overthrew of Jean Bertrand Aristide government.

Following several weeks of conflicts, Jean-Bertrand Aristide was ousted in a 2004 Haitian coup d'état in which one of his former soldiers (Guy Philippe) took the leading role. However, Aristide accused the U.S as one of the accomplices for orchestrating the coup d'état against him with support from Jamaican Prime Minister P. J. Patterson and countries like France, Canada and some others. On 25 February, 2004, Guy Philippe and rebel forces surrounded Port-au-Prince and announced plans to arrest Aristide. On 29 February, 2004, Aristide resigned as President and left Haiti with his wife on board a U.S. military plane to the Central African Republic. In an interview on CNN, on March 2, 2004, he said he was told to resign to avoid bloodshed. He later claimed that, his departure was a kidnapping, accusing the U.S. for orchestrating a coup d'état against him.

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A Caco during the 1915 US Occupation of Haiti

A Caco during the 1915 US Occupation of Haiti

You are looking at a Caco or a Haitian nationalist fighting against the 1915 US Occupation of Haiti.

Great Depression Ends U.S. Occupation in Haiti

When American forces began occupying Haiti in 1915, the island was in political and economic distress. America feared a German takeover of susceptible Haiti, and took control of the country's infrastructure, even writing its Constitution.

Haitians soon grew to hate the Occupation. They felt used, betrayed, and deprived of their autonomy.

Lonely when America's Great Depression occurred did they pull out in 1934 under pressure from American citizens, who disapproved of the U.S. spending too much money in Haiti.

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U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Michel Martelly in Haiti

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Michel Martelly in Haiti

Here is a picture of U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry as he arrived in Haiti. He is meeting Haitian President Michel Martelly.

On October 6, 2015, the U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry stopped at the National Palace in Port-au-Prince to discuss with the Haitian President about the preparations of the country's upcoming presidential and parliamentary elections on October 25th. During his brief stopover, Kerry has said that it is a fact that democracy requires a great deal more than elections, but elections are the essential starting points for democracy. Haiti needs governing institutions that are legitimate and representative and that can be achieved only through a fair and free election. A fair election is an election without any intimidation and violence. Kerry has also stressed that a fair election can establish a representative administration and moreover, it would be an essential starting point for democracy and the key to attract foreign investment.

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Vice President Joe Biden Call with Haitian President Michel Martelly

Vice President Joe Biden Call with Haitian President Michel Martelly

Here is the actual content of the call by Vice President Joe Biden Call with Haitian President Michel Martelly on January 16, 2015

United States Vice President Joe Biden spoke via telephone with the Haitian President, Michel Martelly, on January 16, 2015, following the disappointing end to Haiti's parliament. The US had taken a vested interest in the affair, citing their continued support of the smaller country's development and progress in democracy. It is reported that the President of Haiti was commended on his efforts to secure the necessary parliamentary vote to facilitate an election on the island, including numerous concessions, not the least of which was securing the resignation of his then Prime Minister, Laurent Lamothe.

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