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Police and Law enforcement

Frantz Lerebours, spokesman of the National Police of Haiti

Frantz Lerebours, spokesman of the National Police of Haiti

Here is a picture of Commissioner Frantz Lerebours, the spokesman of the National Police of Haiti (PNH).

Recently, the Commissioner Frantz Lerebours, spokesman of the National Police of Haiti (PNH) has reported a drop in the crime rate in the metropolitan area during the period between March to May, 2016. The figure for some sensitive crime rates between these periods were: (a) Rape: 64 in March, 43 in April and 34 in May; (b) Kidnapping: 10 in March, 3 during April and 1 in May; and (c) Homicide: 107 in March, 80 in April and 52 in May. While acknowledging his satisfaction in the drop in crimes, he has admitted that there were some more responsible factors other than policing which have contributed such drop. Following the publication of October 25 election results, Commissioner Frantz Lerebours arrested at least twelve people who defied all code of conduct for peaceful demonstrations, but later he was involved in an argument about the arrest of the former Head of the Port-au-Prince Prosecutor's Office, former District Attorney, Claudy Gassant and the former Communication Member of the Rene Preval National Palace and the General Secretary of the Haitian party Pitit Dessalines Assad Volcy. They did not allow the police to search their vehicles without the presence of a justice of the peace.

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Police Inspector assassinated in a Tap Tap at Delmas 83

Police Inspector assassinated in a Tap Tap at Delmas 83

Here is a picture of Police Inspector Michel Jumel who was assassinated in a Tap Tap at Delmas 83

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A police officer killed in Haiti

A police officer killed in Haiti

Another Police Officer went down in Haiti. On Friday, May 27, 2016, a police officer named Loubens Desrameaux (born on May 15, 1983) was shot several times near the Place Dessalines at Champ de Mars in the afternoon by some unidentified motorcyclists. Loubens was off duty and was in civil uniform. He was shot several times while buying a bottle of Guinness from a street vendor. Loubens was a native of Sèka Kavajal in the Centre Department, near the Dominican border, and was graduated from the 22nd promotion and worked in the Motor Brigade of Intervention (Quad BIM) of the PNH.

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Michel-Ange Gedeon, Director General of the National Police

Michel-Ange Gedeon, Director General of the National Police

Friday, April 8, 2016, The head of of the Central Directorate of Administrative Police (DCPA) appointed by President Jocelerme Privert to become Director General of the National Police, replacing Godson Orelus.

On the night of April 8, 2016, Michelangelo Gedeon (Michel-Ange Gedeon) has been installed as Director General of the National Police, at the Headquarters of the PNH in Pétion-Ville. He has been installed to the new capacity by the Prime Minister Jean-Charles Enex and the Minister of Justice Camille Edward Jr,, replacing Godson Orélus at a time when the new government is trying to take control of the administration largely led by the associates of former President Martelly. Following his installation, Gedeon has said, he is aware of the big challenges and wants to establish a neutral police force, free from every political influence which would ensure the security of the citizen regardless of the color of their skins. The Prime Minister Enex Jean-Charles, leader of the Supreme Council of the National Police (NUMC) presented a President's certified copy of Gedeon's appointment. Earlier, Michel-Ange Gédéon had served as the Commissioner of Grand Goave (2004), Carrefour (2005), Port-au-Prince (2006-2011) and departmental Director of the western Police (2011-2014). He was promoted to the post of Central Director of Administrative Police (DCPA) on February 29, 2016. Gédéon has submitted 14 of the 16 requested qualifying documents to the Senate Justice and Public Safety Committee for consideration and confirmation. The two outstanding documents were not required because he was never in control of government funds.

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Haiti Police Chief Jean-Robert Faveur

Haiti Police Chief Jean-Robert Faveur

June 21, 2003: Jean-Robert Faveur became Haiti Police Chief under Jean Bertrand Aristide. He resigned on June 21, 2003 after only two weeks on the job, and went into self-imposed exile due to alleged government interference and threats to his life.

In the midnight of Sunday, June 22, 2003, Jean-Robert Faveur, Haiti's former Police Chief fled the country with his family because he felt his life is under threat. He resigned from his office and fled to Miami because of the Haitian government's efforts to undermine the autonomy of his office curbing every operational and financial control. He said President Jean-Bertrand Aristide was filling police ranks only with people loyal to him regardless of their qualifications. They had neither served long enough in their posts nor passed competitive examinations for promotion as the rules demand. The government officials claimed that his departure was preplanned. Since he was a choice of the Organization of American States to lead an efficient police force to hold a credible election under President Aristide, his sudden departure was meant to jeopardize the entire process. However, Faveur said he used his own money to flee. Never received any assistance from any embassy or anyone.

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Haiti's former national police chief, Rudy Therassan

Haiti's former national police chief, Rudy Therassan

Rudy Therassan headed Haitian national police from 2001 until 2003. He was accused by U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration of protecting Colombian cocaine shipments.He was sentenced to almost 15 years in prison and obligated to also forfeit $1.8 million in assets.

In May 2004, Rudy Therassan, Haiti's former National Police Chief (from April 2001 until approximately August 2003) was accused of allegedly taking money from a Colombian drug dealer to protect cocaine shipments passing through Haiti on the way to the United States. In April, 2004, in a U.S. federal court, Therassan pleaded guilty of conspiring to import at least 10 kilograms (22 pounds) of cocaine into the U.S and activities amounting to money laundering. Therassan used to receive $150,000 in cash for each plane-load of cocaine, he allowed to land on Haiti's Route 9, which were subsequently smuggled to the U.S. His $1.8 million in assets, including two houses in Palm Beach County, Florida were forfeited by court order. During his trial, one informant testified that he witnessed Therassan shoot and killed Haitian drug trafficker Hector Ketant's brother and his bodyguard after a dispute over money.

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Former police chiefs Godwork Noel and Jacky Nau

Former police chiefs Godwork Noel and Jacky Nau

Former police chiefs Godwork Noel (left) and Jacky Nau (right). Based on information obtained from the weekly newspaper Haiti Progress, in the United States, these two were involved in a campaign against the democratic movement in Haiti. The report stated that both Godwork Noel and Jacky Nau received military training by U.S. Special Forces.

In October eleven senior police commanders tried to stage a coup D'etat agains the Haitian government; however, the plot was uncovered and officers fled to Ecuador and the Dominican Republic. Those who fled to DR include: Guy Philipe, Mesilor Lemais, Seide Didier, Dormel Jacques Patrick, Fritz Gaspar and Noel Godwork.

The Haitian government formally requested the repatriation of six of the police Officers who had fled to the the Dominican Republic, accusing them of conspiring to overthrow the government. The repatriation did not take place.

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Port-au-Prince police chief, Col. Joseph Michel Francois

Port-au-Prince police chief, Col. Joseph Michel Francois

Col. Joseph Michel Francois was Chief of National Police of Haiti from 1991 to 1994 at a time when Haitian police was technically part of the army. He participated in the 1991 Haitian coup d'état that ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.

Investigation reveals that Joseph Michel Francois built a vast network of independent intelligence service, with the responsibilities to intimidate and sometimes eliminate rivals and opponents.

He also collaborated in shipping tons of cocaine to the United States in the 1980's from his private airstrip in Haiti.

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Leon Charles, named Haiti Police Chief

Leon Charles, named Haiti Police Chief

April, 2004 - Leon Charles, named Haiti Police Chief following the removal of President Jean Bertrand Aristide.

According to information obtained, Leon Charles is a former officer of Haiti Military, FADH, in the Marine division. He became the new Police Chief of Haiti and later was replaced by Mario Andresol. While some people were not satisfied with his job performance, many others think that Leon Charles served his country well

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Haitian Police Chief Mario Andresol As His Force Is Accused For Police Brutality

Haitian Police Chief Mario Andresol As His Force Is Accused For Police Brutality

Here is a picture of Haitian police chief Mario Andresol as new allegation of police brutality just surface on a video.

The Haitian civilian police force was created in 1994 by former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide when he returned to power, in order to end brutality by the military.

This new video showing the current Haitian Police force involved in police Brutality does not help.

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