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Former President

Haiti National Council of Government

Haiti National Council of Government

February 07, 1986 Port-au-Prince, Haiti: Here is a picture of the members of the National Council of Haitian Government, also called military-civilian government or junta that replaced former Haitian dictator Jean-Claud Duvalier. This picture was taken during the ceremony instituting the new team. Members include: Colonel Max Valles, Colonel William Regala, Lieutenant General Henry Namphy, Alix Cineas, Gerard Gourgue, Colonel Prosper Avril.

The National Council of Government was the ruling body of Haiti from 1986 to 1988. Henri Namphy (born November 2, 1932 in Cap-Haïtien) was a political figure and Haitian general. He served as the President of Haiti's such interim ruling body, the National Council of Government, from February 7, 1986 to February 7, 1988. Again, Namphy served as the President of Haiti (from June 20, 1988 to September 17, 1988) until his deposition by a Haitian coup d'état. The National Council of Government was formed as a joint military and civilian provisional government following the exile of President for Life Jean-Claude Duvalier. The council consisted of a President, Lieutenant General Henri Namphy, and five Members, three from the military (Colonel Max Valles, Colonel Prosper Avril and Colonel William Regala) and two civilians (Maitre Gérard Gourgue and Mr. Alix Cinéas). Resignation of Gerard Gourgue on March 20, 1986, led to a commotion among this small group and a new National Council of Government was formed within a month with three members (Colonel William Regala, Mr. Jacques François from April 1987 and Me. Luc D. Hector from February 1988) and 13 ministers. This ruling body took two important measures: rehabilitation of the blue and red Haitian flag on February 17, 1986 and the dissolution of the Volunteers of National Security on February 15, 1986.

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Removal of presidential sash from Michel Martelly

Removal of presidential sash from Michel Martelly

Here is a picture of the ceremony for the removal of presidential sash from President Michel Martelly.

On Sunday, February 7, 2016, Michel Martelly made his farewell speech to the nation as he left his office without any replacement. His day of departure coincidentally became the first day of Port-au-Prince's annual three-day Carnival celebration, which was called off as violent protests erupted in many places. It was as well as the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Duvalier dictatorship. Martelly left the country in the hands of a disputed interim government amid one of the worst political crises in recent years-- and without a president. However, an agreement for a transitional government was reached just twenty two hours before Martelly left his office. To symbolize his departure, Martelly returned the presidential sash to the National Assembly by handing it over to the then National Assembly President Jocelerme Privert.

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Michel Martelly returning presidential sash to National Assembly

Michel Martelly returning presidential sash to National Assembly

Here is a picture of President Michel Martelly as he was returning the presidential sash to the National Assembly.

On February 7, 2016, the former President Martelly to symbolize his departure, returned the presidential sash to the National Assembly by handing it over to the then National Assembly President Jocelerme Privert. The presidential sash is an important symbol of the continuity of the presidency, designed to resemble the nation's flag, or the country's national colors and symbols, especially those of Latin American presidents. Its value as a symbol of the office of the head of state can be compared to that of a crown in monarchies. To symbolize a change, Jean-Bertrand Aristide as a new President chose a peasant woman to put the Presidential sash on him. The next morning, President Aristide served breakfast to hundreds of homeless people and street kids at the National Palace.

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Joseph Nerette and Joseph Raoul Cedras

Joseph Nerette and Joseph Raoul Cedras

Here is a picture Joseph Nérette and Joseph Raoul Cédras.

Following the rule of the leader of the Haitian Military Junta, Raoul Cédras, Haiti's 48th President, a post which was appointed illegally, and after the 1991 ousting of President Aristide, Joseph Nérette began a term of office as the country's provisional president. A former judge, Justice of the Supreme Court, and fixture on the political scene, Nérette would keep the post from October 8, 1991 to June 19, 1992. His death in 2007 at the age of 83 after a battle with lung cancer was well talked about.

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