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haitian creole

Bib-la, The Haitian bible

Bib-la, The Haitian bible

Here is a picture of the Haitian bible. In the haitian creole, the bible is called Bib-La or Bib La. The Haitian bible is written completely in the Haitian Creole and is very popular among the religious people in haiti.

Bib-La is proved to be a good source for the Haitian peple, of which 99 percent of them speak Creole.

Still for many haitians who did not learn the haitian creole in school, Bib la is proved to be very hard to read

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Language, one of the dividing lines within the Haitian society

Language, one of the dividing lines within the Haitian society

French remains the language of the affluent and privileged in Haiti, often used n polite society such as the upscale Supermarkets high above the capital's shanty towns, selling brie and baguettes. Many Haitian parents are often willing to let their children stumble in their coursework just to learn a language that even their teachers barely speak. Creole on the other hand is seen by some as the language of the impoverished masses

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Camaguey, Cuba's city with Haitian link

Camaguey, Cuba's city with Haitian link

Camaguey, Cuba's city with largest concentration of Cubans of Haitian descents city with largest concentration of Cubans of Haitian descent

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Haitian Creole Classes at Miami-Dade College

Haitian Creole Classes at Miami-Dade College

Miami-Dade offers courses in Haitian Creole at several levels. The introductory class HAI2340 explores basics of writing, focusing on punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and vocabulary. HAI2341 is for improving fluency in writing in Haitian-Creole for those wishing to become translators.

HAT2802 is for academics interested in discovering syntax and semantics of Haitian-Creole and English languages. HCW2020 is also for academics that want an understanding of Haitian-Creole literature within the context of Haitian culture and history.

MDC Kendall Campus
11011 SW 104 Street - Miami, FL 33176-3393
305-237-2222

MDC Hialeah Campus
1780 W 49th Street - Hialeah, Florida 33012
305-237-8775

MDC North Campus
11380 NW 27th Ave. - Miami, FL 33167-3495
305-237-1111

MDC Wolfson Campus
300 NE Second Ave. - Miami, FL 33132
305-237-3131

MDC InterAmerican Campus
627 SW 27th Ave. - Miami, FL 33135
305-237-6036

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Moise Jean Charles speaking in French

Moise Jean Charles speaking in French

Here is the Haitian senator from North of Haiti, Moise Jean-Charles speaking in French. There has been a lot of critics about the ability of the senator to express himself into the French Language.

There is a general understanding in Haiti if you are unable to speak French therefore you are not educated or smart.

Senator Moise Jean Charles has become a controversial figure in Haitian politic as he is in opposition to the government of Michel Martelly. He has accused the government for corruption and others.

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Creole ranked 10th most common foreign language spoken at Home in United States

Creole ranked 10th most common foreign language spoken at Home in United States

A survey conducted recently found the Creole language has been gaining ground in the United States. The result indicated that the use of Creole language has increased by 73 percent since 2000. This is a figure that seems to shock many Americans, but not Haitians. The Creole language is now the 10th most common language spoken at Home in United States, other than English.

The Haitian presence in the US has been felt in so many ways, although it has been hard to come up with an accurate figure due to their legal status in the country. This group of immigrant has been very active in the American politic. The hold many elected positions in their city, district or state.

Most of the Creole speaking immigrants are found in in Little Haiti, North Miami and in Broward County and Palm Beaches in Florida. There are also many Haitian Creole speaker throughout the country in places such as New York and Boston

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La Reforme Bernard and Haiti Education System

La Reforme Bernard and Haiti Education System

In 1982, Haiti started a major overhaul in the educational system based on the recommendation of the Haitian professor Joseph C. Bernard (1917 - 2005). He advocated the introduction of Haitian Creole as a language of instruction and a second language is taught in cycles of primary and secondary education for a period of 5 years minimum.

One of the main objectives of his system was to achieve a functional bilingualism after three cycles of elementary school and to achieve that, a language program was developed--both vernacular and second language. Creole was the first choice as the vernacular language of instruction in the five years of basic or primary education and French was taught as a foreign or second language and language of instruction.

There was always an obvious question hanging before-- why the choice of second language did not consider English or Spanish when they too have equal global openings and opportunities. The Reformation Bernard was not very successful because lack of good teaching material and trained teaching staff in Creole.

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Some Facts about Haitian Creole

Some Facts about Haitian Creole

The two Official languages of Haiti are: French, spoken by a small group and Creole spoken by the entire population.

It has been one of Haiti's official languages since 1987 and is the first language of about 95 percent of Haitians, especially in rural areas.

Haitian Creole is a French-based vernacular language that developed in the late 17th and early 18th centuries.

Haitian Creole developed primarily on the sugarcane plantations of Haiti from contacts between French colonists and African slaves.

Haitian Creole is spoken by about twelve million people, which includes the entire population of Haiti and close to four million people of Haitian descent residing in the Bahamas, Belize, Canada, Cayman Islands, Cuba, Dominican Republic, France, French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Ivory Coast, Martinique, Puerto Rico, Trinidad and Tobago, the United States, and Venezuela.

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Felix Morisseau-Leroy Haitian Writer

Felix Morisseau-Leroy Haitian Writer

This is the picture of Haitian writer, Félix Morisseau-Leroy.

Félix Morisseau-Leroy was known for writing many of his work in the Haitian Creole language and he was the first in this area. He was born on March 13, 1912 and died September 5, 1998
Félix Morisseau-Leroy pushed for the recognition of Haitian Creole is widely appreciated. He was given credit for making Creole as an official language of Haiti.
He made some international contributions as well. Félix Morisseau-Leroy helped to develop national literature in Ghana and Senegal. He also contributed to the Haitian community in the Diaspora. In Miami specifically, he was very influential in making Creole accepted in a variety of public institutions and also encouraged its study in academia.

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Tropik Network And Christalie Parisot On NBC

Tropik Network And Christalie Parisot On NBC

Here is a picture of the new Haitian host on NBC, Christalie Parisot being interviewed by the local NBC station about her new program on NBC

She was the host of Tropik Network, a Haitian broadcasting company based in miami, Florida.

Christalie Parisot will be broadcasting the news in the Haitian Creole language to serve the Haitian community living in South Florida.

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