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jean bertrand aristide

Crowd asked for the return of Jean Bertrand Aristide from exile in South Africa

Crowd asked for the return of Jean Bertrand Aristide from exile in South Africa

Here is a picture of a supporter of Jean Bertrand Aristide demanding his return from exile in South Africa

Aristide Returned From Exile In South Africa

Haitian government delivered his diplomatic passport in the month before his return and in this context, the South African Cabinet Minister Collins Chabane had said, " if he wants to go we can't hold him hostage." People in the Haitian political circle were of opinion that any of the election winners could reverse his long awaited return. His return just before the election was not liked by the U.S.. Even at the last moment, they were exerting pressure on South Africa to delay his flight.

As a two time President, he was never able to complete his terms. The first time he was ousted from power in a coup, but restored later through a military intervention in 1994 and during the second time, a rebellion in 2004 forced him to escape from the country. Aristide was a former slum priest in his early life, very popular among the poor Caribbeans.

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Crowd welcoming Jean Bertrand Aristide from Exile in South Africa

Crowd welcoming Jean Bertrand Aristide from Exile in South Africa

Here is the picture of a huge crowd welcoming former Haitian President Jean Bertrand Aristide from Exile in South Africa.

Jean-Bertrand Aristide (61), the former president of Haiti ended his seven years exile in South Africa when he landed on the grounds of Toussaint L'Overture Airport, Port-au-Prince on March 18, 2013. Thousands of his supporters were waiting to welcome him at the airport. His American civil rights and immigration lawyer Ira Kurzban, had earlier announced his plan to return to Haiti. Before his departure from a small airport in Johannesburg, South Africa, Aristide had spoken to about 50 reporters in several languages. The South African Foreign Minister Maite Nkoana-Mashabane accompanied the former President Aristide, his wife, Milfred and two daughters, Christine (14) and Michaela (12) to the airport. His children have passed half of their formative years in exile. Before departing Johannesburg, the former President spoke in Zulu to announce---"the great day has arrived to say goodbye before returning home. Haiti is eagerly waiting as their dreams will be fulfilled on my return. The Haitian people will mark the end of exile and coup d'etats while peacefully we move from social exclusion to social inclusion."

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Michel Martelly, Mildred Trouillot, Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Michel Martelly, Mildred Trouillot, Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Here is a picture of Michel Martelly, Mildred Trouillot and Jean-Bertrand Aristide taken during the historic meeting.

Haitian President Michel Martelly Historic Meeting With Jean Bertrand Aristide

This was the second meeting between these two leaders. Earlier they had met on October 11, 2011. At the first meeting, President Martelly disclosed his plan to organize a conference of former leaders of Haiti. Because he felt that all Haitians should come together in order to build a project, a shared vision is needed to put the country back on its feet. After that meeting, the former President while welcoming the effort of reinforcement had announced that, all necessary steps should be taken to ensure that we can agree and put our heads together. The meeting between these two Presidents was considered as one of the most important steps in the reconciliation process.

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Historic meeting Michel Martelly and Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Historic meeting Michel Martelly and Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Here is a picture taken from that Historic meeting between Michel Martelly and Jean-Bertrand Aristide

As per news dated September 21, 2013, the Haitian President Michel Martelly, as part of the national reconciliation, had a private meeting with his predecessor, two-time President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. The meeting between the two leaders was on the part of a series of discussions between the President and the leaders of different opposition parties to resolve the impending crisis the country was heading to face for its failure to held overdue legislative and local elections. However, the details of their discussions were not disclosed to the press. The meeting was scheduled almost one week before a planned anti-government protests to mark the 12th anniversary of Aristide's first ouster as President. Aristide had served three different times as Haitian President: (i) in 1991, till he was removed in a coup; (ii) between 1994 and 1996; and (iii) from 2001 to 2004. On 28 February 2004, he was removed in a coup and within a disputed circumstance, arising out of violent rebellion, Aristide was flown out of the country by the U.S. His party, Fanmi Lavalas, was barred from participating the election of 2011.

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Protest against Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Protest against Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Here is a picture of a protest during the government of Jean Bertrand Aristide

The Group of 184 was led by two of the country's most reviled multimillionaires. (1) Andy Apaid, Jr., a U.S. citizen and the owner of Haiti's largest sweatshops, and (2) Reginald Boulos, owner of a Haitian pharmaceutical firm whose products had killed dozens of poor Haitians. They both had good links with the influential media (ANMH). The G184, dominated by Haitian elites, was often criticized for two main reasons: (i) while selecting members from different sectors of civil society, the selection was dominated by the representation with one special interests, i.e., private sector business associations; and (ii) A vast array of other important civil society organizations were being ignored. Their experience, expertise and advice were not sought and utilized. Once G184 became synonymous to the Haitian proverb."Bourik travay, chwal galonnen" (the donkey does the work, the horse gets the profit).

Once it was alleged that, ten of its members (anti-Aristide) representing business communities who mainly control G184 and its projects, received a funding of $23 million from the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) to promote and encourage their businesses and Haiti's anti-Aristide movement.

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Group 184 and the protest against Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Group 184 and the protest against Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Here is a picture of a massive demonstration organized during Jean-Bertrand Aristide reign

Group Of 184 And The Protest Against Jean Bertrand Aristide

The Group of 184 (Groupe 184), although now defunct, had been the Haitian public voice as well as it was the best salesperson for Haiti. It was the most powerful coalition of "civil society" organizations during the lead up to the 2004 coup that successfully destabilized Haiti's elected government and deposed President Aristide. It consisted both individuals and organizations, arranged in thirteen sectors like cultural, urban neighborhood, private enterprise, labor and peasant unions, feminist, media, human rights, non-governmental organization, etc.,. They had an agenda against the largest corporations in Haiti--the owners of such corporations constituted less than 1% of the population but owned over 50% of the country's wealth.

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Democratic Convergence named Gerard Gourgue Haiti provisional president

Democratic Convergence named Gerard Gourgue Haiti provisional president

The relationship between Former Haitian President Jean Bertrand Aristide and law professor Gerard Gourgue was contentious. The Aristide reign was marked by the decision of the coalition o the Democratic Convergence to select Mr. Gerard Gourgue as a provisional president along side with Jean Bertrand Aristide

Democratic Convergence named Gerard Gourgue Haiti provisional president

Following the removal of then president Jean Bertrand Aristide, the special group put together to oust him, The Democratic Convergence, named a provisional president in Gerard Gourgue. the group represented almost all the political organizations in the country except that of the president, and they made Gourgue president for a two-year period following the coup against Aristide. This provisional government was given support from a number of parties including the Haitian labor confederation, the Mouvman Peyizan Papay, and the Independent Intersyndical Movement.

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Andre Apaid, Evans Paul and Guy Philippe converging on Aristide

Andre Apaid, Evans Paul and Guy Philippe converging on Aristide

André Apaid, Jr. is one of the leaders of the Group of 184 which forced Jean-Bertrand Aristide from power in 2004.

Evans Paul also called K-plimo was elected mayor of Port-au-Prince in the 1990. He was one of the leaders of the Convergence Démocratique that contributed to the 2004 Haitian coup d'état which overthrew Aristide.

Guy Philippe led a group of former soldiers to take arms against President Jean Bertrand Aristide. He was given credit for the 2004 Haitian coup d'état that ousted Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Andre Apaid, Evans Paul and Guy Philippe converging on Aristide

Uniting the forces of the U.S. government, at that time the Bush administration, the elite class of Haiti, and worldwide republican institutions, The Convergence Démocratique, an amalgam of over 200 groups, worked to oppose the then President of Haiti, Jean-Bertrand Aristide. The group, led by a one-time Aristide supporter and former mayor of Port-au-Prince, Evans Paul, Andre Apaid, and Guy Philippe, would eventually get him out of power. In their campaign, they openly asked the U.S. to invade the country, get rid of the then president, and rebuild the army, which had been disbanded. The convergence was dissolved after they attained their feat following the coup that ousted Aristide.

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Political relationship, Martelly-Lamothe, Aristide-Preval

Political relationship, Martelly-Lamothe, Aristide-Preval

Is there such a thing as political friendship? Can a political friend be considered a real friend?

There is a very good reason why I am asking this question. In Haiti as it is the case in many other countries, I see political relationships being formed regularly. Michel Martelly, although he has known Laurent Lamothe well before, they have decided to form political partners. will this new venture end their long time relationship or not?

The Haitian President and his Prime Minister were at one point inseparable. However, in politic, the rules are different. If you dont trust me, go ask Preval or Aristide. Not too long ago, Former President Jean Bertrand Aristide and his Prime Minister Rene Preval were in the same position. Just watching how the relationship between Jean Bertrand Aristide and Rene Preval has deteriorated since President Aristide has left office, i can't help to ask the same question between the Martelly-Lamothe team.

With the Presidential commission recommending the resignation of Laurent Lamothe as Prime Minister, will the relationship remain?

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Judge Lamarre Belizaire and Jean Bertrand Aristide

Judge Lamarre Belizaire and Jean Bertrand Aristide

As this picture illustrates here, it seems that Former Haitian President Jean Bertrand Aristide is making Judge Lamarre Belizaire having a double vision. Others will say that he is obsessed with the Haitian Leader.

Within the past two Months, the Judge has issued a total of 5 Court Orders in an attempt to bring the Lavalas leader to Court to respond to some heavy accusations against him. However, all these Court Orders have not been able to be executed

Finally, I would recommend the Judge himself carry his orders by going to the home of Jean Bertrand Aristide and take him to jail

Police Chief Orelus refuses to deliver Aristide to Judge Belizaire despite Warnings

Judge Belizaire has issued an extraction order to Police Chief Orelus to take ex-President Aristide to Belizaire's office. Aristide is already under house arrest.

Belizaire warned Orelus he would take legal action against Orelus if he didn't comply with the extraction order, the same threat he made last month to Orelus about not issuing an arrest warrant.

Aristide is alleged to have been involved in money laundering, drug trafficking, and embezzlement of hundreds of millions during his presidency.

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