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jean bertrand aristide

The massacre of La Scierie, town of Saint-Marc

The massacre of La Scierie, town of Saint-Marc

Here are some picture of the massacre of La Scierie in the town of Saint-Marc.

A few days before the departure of Aristide on February 29, 2004 following a coup d'état, about 44 Lavalas opponents were killed. Seven people were arrested, including former Prime Minister Yvon Neptune, former Deputy Amanus Mayette and former Interior Minister and present Provisional President Jocelerme Privert. Most people of St Marc, including the National Coalition for Haitian Rights (NCHR-Haiti) insisted that Prime Minister Neptune was responsible for the genocide. NCHR described that as-- "cruel, horrific, savage and barbaric" "crime against humanity"; it was "genocide. However, the former Prime Minister Neptune had objected to the term 'massacre', because he considered "that was a fight between two different sides. Ramicose, which was an organization close to the opposition, fought with Bale Wouze, which was a popular organization belonging to Lavalas." However, no sufficient evidence was found, none of the accused were convicted, nor even tried in connection with the La Scierie incident. In a recent interview on Radio Magic 9, the Provisional President Jocelerme Privert rejected every allegation when he was asked about his involvement in the massacre of La Scierie in Saint-Marc town.

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Amaral Duclona, gang leader in Cite Soleil, Operation bagdad

Amaral Duclona, gang leader in Cite Soleil, Operation bagdad

Here is a picture of Amaral Duclona, gang leader in Cité Soleil, Operation Bagdad.

Amaral Duclona, aka "Berthone Jolicoeur, is a charismatic Haitian who was born and brought up in the slums of Cité Soleil. He was the leader of a gang "chimeric", close to the former President Aristide and a foot soldier in the Aristide's terrorist army of Operation Baghdad. On January 6, 2004, Claude Bernard Lauture (Billy, 51 year old), a Haitian/ French businessman in the electrical engineering field, and a member of the Group of 184 (which was the most powerful coalition of "civil society" organizations in Haiti during the lead up to the 2004 coup that ousted Aristide), was abducted by gunmen while he was driving. A few hours later, his family received a ransom call of $100,000. The next day, his body was found riddled with bullets in Cité Soleil, the largest slum in Haiti. Duclona was arrested in September 2009 in the Dominican Republic and extradited to France in 2010; he was accused of kidnapping, forcible confinement and murder of Claude Lauture. In May 2014 during the first trial, the Court of Assise in Paris convicted Amaral Duclona to 25 years in jail. As per Billy's widow, Marie Louise Michele Lauture's statement, former President Jean Bertrand Aristide was behind the murder. On Friday, February 12, 2016, in the trial on appeal of Amaral Duclona, the Assize Court of Créteil (Val-de-Marne, France) has completely acquitted him of all charges as the court not get sufficient evidence from some of the key Haitian witnesses to testify against him.

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Patrick Elie, former Secretary of State for Public Security, dead

Patrick Elie, former Secretary of State for Public Security, dead

Here is a picture of Patrick Elie, former Secretary of State for Public Security.

Patrick Elie, a longtime pro-democracy activist and Haiti's former Secretary of State for Public Security passed away at the age of 66, in the morning of Friday, February 12, 2016, in a private hospital in Port-au-Prince. He fractured his femur bone after a fall and was suffering from a stomach ulcer. He died of internal bleeding. He delivered his last public speech on February 5, 2016; it was about the march of the disbanded army on the streets of Port-au-Prince. Patrick Elie had been in Haiti as a political activist since 1986, when people's popular movement drove former dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier from the country. He took part in movements with Rene Preval, Jean-Bertrand Aristide and Antoine Izmery. He was a companion of many other pro-democracy activists who fought against the military governments that assumed power after Duvalier was ousted.

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Maryse Narcisse, Mildred Trouillot Aristide at Jocelerme Privert's investiture

Maryse Narcisse, Mildred Trouillot Aristide at Jocelerme Privert's investiture

Maryse Narcisse, Mildred Trouillot Aristide at Jocelerme Privert's investiture.

The inauguration ceremony of former Senator Jocelerme Privert as the Provisional President at the National Palace on February 14, 2016 was attended by many personalities from the political and diplomatic worlds. Many noted business personalities and political allies like Jean Charles Moise, Mathias Pierre, US Ambassador Peter F. Mulrean, head of the PNH, and some hardcore oppositions of Martelly like Dr. (Mrs.) Maryse Narcisse (presidential candidate of Fanmi Lavalas) and former First Lady Mildred Trouillot Aristide (wife of Jean-Bertrand Aristide, a rare political appearance) were seen among the witness of Privert's investiture. Prime Minister Evans Paul was seen among the attendees, watching as an onlooker in a marginalized manner. Could this be a message to the Martelly aids that they have no place in the Privert's administration? Privert will pick Haiti's next Prime Minister, in consultation with the Speakers of the House and Senate.

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Jean-Bertrand Aristide, Mildred Aristide, Christine Aristide, Michaelle Aristide

Jean-Bertrand Aristide, Mildred Aristide, Christine Aristide, Michaelle Aristide

Here is the former Haitian president with his family. Jean-Bertrand Aristide wife Mildred with their children Christine and Michaelle.

One of the accomplishments of Jean Bertrand Aristide and the Lavalas administration is that the country say a drastic increase in the number of schools in the country. Jean Bertrand Aristide and Rene Preval built 195 new primary schools and 104 secondary schools.
His government was also credited for providing thousands of scholarships so that children could afford to attend schools. During the government of Jean Bertrand Aristide the percentage of children enrolled in primary school education rose to 72%.

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Jean Bertrand Aristide, 1995 Je veux et Je peux

Jean Bertrand Aristide, 1995 Je veux et Je peux

Here is a statement considered to be one of the most famous. In a speech given in 1995, President Jean Bertrand Aristide being very upset of gun violence in the sociery stated: I order that the removal of guns in the streets of Haiti be complete and legal. From now on, regardless of the vehicle that passes doing a drive by shooting, that all the other vehicles bolck the traffic to block these individuals. I am the head of state, responsible for the security of each Haitian and I want, and I can and I want, and I want.

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Himmler Rebu, Evans Paul in Anti-Aristide march, Cap-Haitian

Himmler Rebu, Evans Paul in Anti-Aristide march, Cap-Haitian

Here is a picture taken in on November 17, 2002 in Cap-Haitian. As you can see in the picture ex-Haitian Army colonel in the leopard unit Himmler Rebu with Haitian activist, political figure and leader of the Democratic Unity Convention party Evans Paul. This took place during a anti government protest. It was organized by the opposition of the Aristide government with the objective to apply more pressure on the government of Jean Bertrand Aristide. Over 15,000 anti-government demonstrators were estimated to take part in this protest.

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Victims of the Haitian Military Coup in 1991 against Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Victims of the Haitian Military Coup in 1991 against Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Victims of the Haitian Military Coup in 1991 against Jean-Bertrand Aristide

In the 1990's Haiti, under the leadership of Jean-Bertrand Aristide, was thrust into a worldwide political agenda that would make them a "problem" for the United States. A coup d'etat would occur in 1991 which would lead to the deaths of many of those opposed to the ousting of Aristide and the subsequent rule of the army. It would lead to two years of killings, between '91 and '93 of mass murders, for which the army officials would be granted amnesty. The carnage would continue into Aristide's second term when, in 2004, an untold number of people disappeared and were killed while the UN had control of the country.

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Jean Bertrand Aristide, Maryse Narcisse voting in Lycee Jean Marie

Jean Bertrand Aristide, Maryse Narcisse voting in Lycee Jean Marie

Jean Bertrand Aristide and Dr. Maryse Narcisse voting at the voting center in Lycee Jean Marie.

2015 Election Day in Haiti Experiences Few Outbreaks of Violence: Mostly Peaceful Process. The presidential and legislative elections were held on October 25th, and the consensus was voting at the polls was relatively trouble-free despite some irregularities and random violence. Both Head of the European Union Observation Mission, Elena Valencian, and Platform of Haitian Organizations of Human Rights, Antonal Mortime, concurred the electoral process went well despite some exceptions.

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Jean Bertrand Aristide and Maryse Narcisse -

Jean Bertrand Aristide and Maryse Narcisse -

Here is Jean Bertrand Aristide and Maryse Narcisse on the last day of campaigning.

Dr. Narcisse is a former Minister of Public Health and a former employee of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Earlier, to this on September 30, 2015, the former President Aristide spoke before an audience of 2,000 supporters who gathered outside his house. He urged them to support his candidate Dr. Maryse Narcisse. That was the first occasion for him to speak in public since his return from exile in 2011.

October 25 is a day for the first round of presidential elections and it is also the day for the second round of its legislative and municipal elections. The Interim Electoral Council (CEP i.e., Conseil Electoral Provisoire) responsible for holding Haiti election, financed by the international community via the United Nations, has billed more than $50 million for holding the election, but most Haitians consider it as a corrupt institution.

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