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mulato-politic

Noirisme movement, a result of the American occupation in Haiti

Noirisme movement, a result of the American occupation in Haiti

In the 1930s, US invaded Haiti and introduced a racist policies carried out by U.S. Marines. An overall preferential but still racist treatment of Haiti's Mulato elite. During and after the American occupation in Haiti, a movement started that turning the intellectual class toward a greater appreciation of blackness, African culture. Francois Duvalier campaigned on this political ideology Noirism or Negritude Movement

"Noirisme Ideology" was defined by Matthew J. Smith (2004) as an ideology "which advocated total control of the state apparatus by black representatives of the popular classes." It is a form of political and cultural ideology that grew out of indigenism (ideologies associated with indigenous peoples), which in turn was a reaction to the American occupation of 1915 to 1934, and until the 1940's when Haiti gained back the control of its national bank. Although "color politics" were an integral part of Haiti's political scenery long before the arrival of the Marines, their presence served to strengthen the problem. During this period of U.S occupation, Haiti put an end to the Franco-German control of the Haitian economy and permanently shifted towards the U.S. However, Smith himself considered this as incomplete definition unless Occupation and post-Occupation scenarios in Haiti are considered and factors like radical, psychological, cultural, ethnological and political ideologies are taken into account.

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Alexandre Petion and Haiti land reform

Alexandre Petion and Haiti land reform

Alexandre Petion has introduced a land reform following the independence of Haiti that many would agree has cost the country a great deal.

Christophe went to the north and Pétion took the southern Republic of Haiti. One major act by Alexandre Pétion was land redistribution. He seized commercial plantations from the rich and had the land redistributed to his supporters and the peasantry.

In the short term, that earned him lot of respect and appreciation by the beneficiaries. He earned the nickname Papa Bon-C"ur "good-hearted father" as a result.

The land seizures and redistribution ended up reducing the production of commodities for the export economy. As a result, most of the population became subsistence farmers. Exports and state revenue declined sharply.

A look at the present land ownership situation in Haiti would make one think about this original decision

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Louis Dejoie, a political leader in Haiti with Daniel Fignole

Louis Dejoie, a political leader in Haiti with Daniel Fignole

During the Pre-Duvalier time. The political environment in Haiti was very unstable and one of the leaders was the mulatto, landowner, industrialist, and Haitian Politician Louis Dejoie. The next president of Haiti was expected to be either Daniel Fignole or Louis Dejoie. Unfortunately none of the two became president.

Francois Duvalier was elected president of Haiti. After his landslide victory, Francois Duvalier exiled Dejoie's supporters and established a new constitution.

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Daniel Fignole and his struggle with the Mulato Elite class

Daniel Fignole  and his struggle with the Mulato Elite class

Daniel Fignole was very intelligent and excelled in school.

He co-founded a newspaper called Chantiers in 1942. He specifically went after the Mulato elite in Haiti for their selfishness and advocate for social programs to uplift the majority black poor class. This newspaper was ordered closed by president Elie Lescot

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