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Language, one of the dividing lines within the Haitian society

Language, one of the dividing lines within the Haitian society

French remains the language of the affluent and privileged in Haiti, often used n polite society such as the upscale Supermarkets high above the capital's shanty towns, selling brie and baguettes. Many Haitian parents are often willing to let their children stumble in their coursework just to learn a language that even their teachers barely speak. Creole on the other hand is seen by some as the language of the impoverished masses

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Nou tout sanble, menm le nou diferan

Nou tout sanble, menm le nou diferan

Here is the winning logo for Nou tout sanble, menm lè nou diferan

On Monday, December 21, 2015, as part of the second civic education campaign, Nesmy Manigat, the Minister of National Education, launched the music and literary contest "Nou tout sanble, menm lè nou diferan" in collaboration with the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Civic Action. The music and literary competitions and a DJ contest at the national level was launched in the presence of several artists such as, Roosevelt Saillant aka "BIC" Eunide Édouarin aka "Princess Eud "and K-Libr. At the first phase of this initiative, Neyssa T. Demorcy (17 year old), a student of the Institution of the Sacred heart of Turgeau won the competition logo placed in the framework of the campaign "Nou Tout Sanble, menm lè nou diferan", defeating five other competitors. The first phase of the competition started in October 2015. The objective of the program was to incorporate values among the youth so that they understand the value of togetherness, respect and search for excellence.

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Minister of Culture Dithny Joan RATON and Michel Martelly

Minister of Culture Dithny Joan RATON and Michel Martelly

Here is a picture of Minister of Culture Dithny Joan RATON and Michel Martelly

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Haitian Voodoo and Homosexuality

Haitian Voodoo and Homosexuality

A large number of spirits or deities (lwa) exist in Haitian Voodoo. Some lwas such as Erzulie, Ghede Nibo, Baron Samedi and Maman Brigitte exhibit movements that cross gender boundaries. However, overt identification as homosexuals has no place within the tradition of the Haitian Voodoo religion

During Haitian Vodou ceremonies, a person can be possessed by any Loa, regardless of gender. During possession, possessed dancers will begin to behave like the lwa they are possessed by and they are treated with the utmost respect.

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Some Facts about Haitian Creole

Some Facts about Haitian Creole

The two Official languages of Haiti are: French, spoken by a small group and Creole spoken by the entire population.

It has been one of Haiti's official languages since 1987 and is the first language of about 95 percent of Haitians, especially in rural areas.

Haitian Creole is a French-based vernacular language that developed in the late 17th and early 18th centuries.

Haitian Creole developed primarily on the sugarcane plantations of Haiti from contacts between French colonists and African slaves.

Haitian Creole is spoken by about twelve million people, which includes the entire population of Haiti and close to four million people of Haitian descent residing in the Bahamas, Belize, Canada, Cayman Islands, Cuba, Dominican Republic, France, French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Ivory Coast, Martinique, Puerto Rico, Trinidad and Tobago, the United States, and Venezuela.

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Haiti among least diverse countries in the world

Haiti among least diverse countries in the world

Haiti, one of the least culturally diverse countries in the world in 2013

Based on a study done on more than 180 countries, it was concluded that Argentina, Haiti or the isolated Comoros islands off the southeast coast of Africa are the countries least culturally diverse.

On the other hand, countries like Chad and Togo, with more than 37 tribal groups that speak more than 39 languages and where the various groups did not share common culture or history were most culturally diverse.

Argentina, the Comoros, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Rwanda and Uruguay rank as the world's least diverse countries

A caution: Cultural diversity is a different concept than ethnic diversity

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Religious Coalition Against Gay Marriage

Religious Coalition Against Gay Marriage

President Gérard of a religious coalition has denounced gay people marrying. Gérard spoke of marriage between heterosexuals, whose purpose is procreation. Gay marriages will violate God's plan.

Gérard warns government of Haiti against enacting laws permitting gay couples to wed. Leaning on Holy Scripture interpretation, Gérard feels it necessary to repudiate same-sex marriages.

Protest Federation of Haiti President, Sylvaint Exantus, requests educators develop a strong moral code in children to guide their actions according to God's plan.

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Funeral in Haitian Culture - Prayer and crying

Funeral in Haitian Culture - Prayer and crying

Much prayer and crying accompanies the death of a loved one in Haiti. With home being the place most desired for a passing, sojourns are made by all available family members to start the mourning process. The congregation of family is so important that a body is not moved from the home until all family members have gathered. Then, the oldest begins arranging the funeral and another relative washes the dead. When these have been prepared, one of the three mourning practices begins.

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Funeral in Haitian Culture - Grievers kicking and fighting

Funeral in Haitian Culture - Grievers kicking and fighting

The church is packed and the atmosphere is somber. Then, a mighty wail sounds and it is not necessarily coming from a member of the family. Spoken of in the Bible, the sometimes hired 'grievers' that frequent Haitian funerals, are as much a distraction as they are an attraction. They wail and scream and are often seen being carried out of churches kicking and fighting their extractors. It's hard to tell at the beginning of a service just which of the nicely dressed ladies will soon begin convulsing and screaming in anguish, but it's a guarantee there will be at least one at your next funeral.

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Funeral in Haitian Culture

Funeral in Haitian Culture

Funerals are often always two-location affairs. In Haiti, many funeral goers don't have cars and have to find alternate ways of getting from the church to the graveside. The vehicle of choice... one's own two feet as a member of the human funeral procession. The dead is driven in a hearse, and the mourners follow behind, often accompanied by a brass band.

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