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Haitian children fathered by U.N. peacekeepers

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Haitian children fathered by U.N. peacekeepers

Here is a picture of Haitian children fathered by U.N. peacekeepers.

The U.N. peacekeeping force, MINUSTAH, was sent to Haiti in 2004 to keep order following a movement that toppled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. since, some peacekeepers have been accused of several abuses including rape, using excessive force, introducing cholera and fathering children in some cases with under age women.

A recent report released by the United Nation has brought to light the dark side of the U.N personnel-- sexual exploitation and abuse against civilians while they were stationed in countries plagued by conflict and natural disaster. The revelation came after interviewing 231 people in Haiti, who claimed that they were forced to perform sexual acts with the UN peacekeepers in exchange for 'basic necessities'. In the past, the UN workers were accused in a similar way of fathering and subsequently abandoning children at the end of their deployment in Cambodia, Mozambique, Bosnia, Sudan, Kosovo, Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. A report reveals that UN Peacekeepers fathered 24,500 babies in Cambodia and 6,600 in Liberia. The U.N. force in Haiti currently includes 4,899 uniformed personnel, a combination of military and civilian police, from more than a dozen countries. As per Ghandi Shukry, the head of a Conduct and Discipline Unit in the U.N. mission, 29 claims for paternity have been submitted against MINUSTAH to the U.N. in Haiti and 18 of them were classified as 'victims', because they were receiving some kinds of supports. There are many unreported instances of non-payment where the women took the badges of the peacekeepers and threatened to reveal their infidelity via social media. However, in 2003, the U.N Secretary General circulated a bulletin on "Zero Tolerance Policy" in this regard.

Tags: minustah, united nations, Child, united nation, child statistics, u.n., newsletter, Child Neglect

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