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Haiti National Council of Government

Haiti National Council of Government

February 07, 1986 Port-au-Prince, Haiti: Here is a picture of the members of the National Council of Haitian Government, also called military-civilian government or junta that replaced former Haitian dictator Jean-Claud Duvalier. This picture was taken during the ceremony instituting the new team. Members include: Colonel Max Valles, Colonel William Regala, Lieutenant General Henry Namphy, Alix Cineas, Gerard Gourgue, Colonel Prosper Avril.

The National Council of Government was the ruling body of Haiti from 1986 to 1988. Henri Namphy (born November 2, 1932 in Cap-Haïtien) was a political figure and Haitian general. He served as the President of Haiti's such interim ruling body, the National Council of Government, from February 7, 1986 to February 7, 1988. Again, Namphy served as the President of Haiti (from June 20, 1988 to September 17, 1988) until his deposition by a Haitian coup d'état. The National Council of Government was formed as a joint military and civilian provisional government following the exile of President for Life Jean-Claude Duvalier. The council consisted of a President, Lieutenant General Henri Namphy, and five Members, three from the military (Colonel Max Valles, Colonel Prosper Avril and Colonel William Regala) and two civilians (Maitre Gérard Gourgue and Mr. Alix Cinéas). Resignation of Gerard Gourgue on March 20, 1986, led to a commotion among this small group and a new National Council of Government was formed within a month with three members (Colonel William Regala, Mr. Jacques François from April 1987 and Me. Luc D. Hector from February 1988) and 13 ministers. This ruling body took two important measures: rehabilitation of the blue and red Haitian flag on February 17, 1986 and the dissolution of the Volunteers of National Security on February 15, 1986.

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Jocelerme Privert and wife Dr. Ginette M.PRIVERT

Jocelerme Privert and wife Dr. Ginette M.PRIVERT

Here is a picture of President Jocelerme Privert and wife Ginette M.PRIVERT.

On Tuesday, February 23, 2016, Dr. Ginette Michaud Privert, the first lady of the republic, visited the construction site of the Faculty of Medicine. The 2010 earthquake caused severe damage to this Haiti's medical school. A Canadian coalition, initiated by the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada (AFMC), in collaboration with other medical groups is working to rebuild it. The First Lady was accompanied by Dr. Max Rudolph St-Albin, Director General of the Office of Industrial Accidents Insurance, Sickness and Maternity (OFATMA). On the next day, she paid a courtesy visit to the Embassy of Haiti in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and met Ambassador Magali Jeanty Magloire. Her husband, Jocelerme Privert, the present interim President was a former Interior Minister and the President of the Senate Committee on Economy and Finance.

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Pierre Theoma Boisrond-Canal, born town of Les Cayes

Pierre Theoma Boisrond-Canal, born  town of Les Cayes

Here is a picture of Pierre Théoma Boisrond-Canal who served as the President of Haiti three times.

Boisrond-Canal was born in 1932 and went into military service from 1858 until 9 years later when he retired to take up farming. Three years later, he would become embroiled in politics and rose quickly to be senator of Port-au-Prince twice. Like many political figures, he was exiled for a period, in Jamaica, but was made, upon his return, army commander of the Ouest Department by President Domingue. The first of Boisrond-Canal's three presidencies began in 1876 when he replaced Domingue as provisional leader before presiding non-provisionally as of July 17 that year. During his first run, he reinstated the 1867 constitution, which Domingue had replaced in 1874.

His inability to successfully mediate the National and Liberal parties compelled him to resign in 1879. His replacement, President Lysius Salomon would himself resign in 1888, and Boisrond-Canal was once again president, this time in an acting capacity. His last run as president was in 1902 when he was appointed interim president. This post lasted from May 26 to December 17, when he was succeeded by Pierre Nord Alexis.

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Oreste Zamor, short and extremely chaotic presidency

Oreste Zamor, short and extremely chaotic presidency

Here is a picture of Oreste Zamor who served as president of Haiti in 1914. His presidency was described as short and extremely chaotic

Emmanuel Oreste Zamor (1861-1915) had served as the Haitian President in 1914 for a little over 8 months (February 8, 1914 - October 25, 1914). He was the leader of a countryside army called 'Cacos' that often took part in rebellions. The Cacos supported Zamor because he had promised to keep them on the government payroll. Zamor and his government were facing a rebellion that grew louder every day in the North. Oreste Zamor himself took the head of his troops to the North, however, he had to retreat. When he came back to Port-au-Prince, his responsible cabinet members were rushing for foreign legation. He was arrested by his successor Guillaume Sam who overthrew him and locked him up in the National Penitentiary. Zamor was murdered along with other 167 political prisoners.

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Jean-Jacques Louis Philippe Guerrier, career officer, President of Haiti

Jean-Jacques Louis Philippe Guerrier, career officer, President of Haiti

Here is a picture of Jean-Jacques Louis Philippe Guerrier who was a career officer and President of Haiti from May 3, 1844 to April 15, 1845.

Jean-Jacques Louis Philippe Guerrier (born 19 December, 1757; died 15 April, 1845) was a Career Officer and a General in the Haitian army. He was a respected soldier who successfully commanded the Southern Black Army during the Haitian revolution. Philippe Guerrier was an octogenarian when he assumed the Presidency. He was illiterate but that deficiency and lack of knowledge was counterbalanced by his love for the country. He was a moderate dictator, much respected by the peasants. The Mullatto hierarchy displaced his predecessor President Rivière-Hérard and replaced him with this aged black general as President on May 3, 1844. Guerrier held his office for only 11 months before he died on April 15, 1845.

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Jean Bertrand Aristide and Raoul Cedras

Jean Bertrand Aristide and Raoul Cedras

Here is a picture of Former Haitian President with General Raoul Cedras.

Haitian military leader Joseph Raoul Cedras was born in Jeremie and American-educated. He rose to prominence as a soldier in the Leopard Corps, trained under U.S. forces. The U.S. and France, impressed by his leadership skills, selected him to head security in Haiti's 1990-1991 state and local elections. Jean-Bertrand Aristide won his bid for the presidency and chose Cedras as Commander-in-Chief of the Haitian army, Cedras also retaining the position of Lieutenant General.

Meanwhile the U.S. was threatening to invade Haiti unless they could persuade Jonassaint to leave office. Jonassaint complied. Cedras by this point was a nationally feared figure, responsible for the massacres of 3,000-plus men, women, and children while in power.

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Michel Oreste, one of the many Presidents of Haiti

Michel Oreste, one of the many Presidents of Haiti

Michel Oreste Lafontant, president of Haiti from May 1913 to January 1914.

Haiti has had many presidents, but one, the 23rd, holds the distinction of being the first to unite disparate officials within the country toward the common goal he sought, unifying Haiti and planning its progress, including the rebuilding of the destroyed National Palace. Born in April 1859, Michel Oreste-Lafontant was a reformist who was president from May 1913 through to January the following year. His short term was due to the terror wrought on the nation by 'les cacos'. Soon, the country forgot the slow rebuilding their relatively new president was spearheading and drove him out of office. He would die while still in exile in New York in October 1918.

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Pierre Nord Alexis, President of Haiti

Pierre Nord Alexis, President of Haiti

A picture of Pierre Nord Alexis, President of Haiti

Pierre Nord Alexis drifted into politics, finding himself on the opposition to the governing president of the time, President Salomon. During this period, he found himself on the other side of the law, as his very vocal opposition would have him imprisoned multiple times before a revolt put paid to that president too. Luckily for him, the new head of state, President Florvil Hippolyte, was in his corner, and Alexis was given a military post of some importance.

Fast forward many years and more intrigue, at the age of 82, Alexis led his loyal troops with him into the Chamber of Deputies. He had thus seized power, becoming the 19th president of the country. He would keep this power for six years, ruling through a time when many rebellions against his administration were many. In December of 1908, the power was wrested from him and he took up exile in Jamaica, before moving to the states with his family.

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President Nord Alexis in 1908

President Nord Alexis in 1908

This is a picture of President Nord Alexis in 1908.

Already in his 80s when he was elected as President of the Republic, Pierre Nord Alexis had seen the fulfillment of a promising military career, before even turning his eye to politics. Born in August 1820, military service was in his blood as the son of Nord Alexis, an official with a high rank within the regime of Henri Christophe, who was also Pierre's grandfather through his illegitimate daughter, Blézine Georges. This legacy would lead him toward the call to duty early, and he joined the army as a teenager under the President, Jean Louis Pierrot.

his journey through the army, however, was not a smooth one. By 1874, he been exiled, unable to return to the country for many years until after a new President was elected.

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Jean-Nicolas Nissage Saget, President of Haiti

Jean-Nicolas Nissage Saget, President of Haiti

Here is a picture of Nissage Saget, President of Haiti

Jean-Nicolas Nissage Saget was the president who succeeded Sylvain Salnave in 1869. Probably his greatest achievement was being the country's first president to serve out his entire term in office, having ruled from 1869 until his voluntary retirement in 1874.

Many years later, he left farm life behind and joined the army. He found great success, flying through the ranks quickly until he was awarded command of the military base in Leogane. Sagat earned himself a fair bit of goodwill when, following President Faustin Sououque's abandonment of the Democratic Republic to set himself up as Emperor, the two men didn't see eye to eye. The tension came to a head after General Sagat's continued refusal to bend to the will of the President's order to execute citizens falsely accused of conspiring against the state.

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