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Henri Namphy Haitian General and President , buried in Dominican Republic

Henri Namphy Haitian General and President , buried in Dominican Republic

Henri Namphy (November 2, 1932 - June 26, 2018)
Henri Namphy was a Haitian general and political figure who served as President of Haiti's interim ruling body, the National Council of Government, from February 7, 1986 to February 7, 1988.

He Once again served as President of Haiti from June 20, to September 17, 1988. He is buried in the Dominican Republic, where he was exiled after being overthrown in September 1988 by Prosper Avril.

Chief of General Staff of the Haitian Armed Forces, Brigadier General Sadrac Saintil, represented the General Staff and the Ministry of Defense as well as Antonio Rodrigue, the Minister of Foreign Affairs was also present at the funeral to represent the Haitian government.

Henri Namphy (November 2, 1932), was a former Haitian coup leader and Lieutenant General who served the country in the Armed Forces of Haiti (FADH), died in a hospital in the Dominican Republic on Tuesday, June 26, 2018, following a battle with lung cancer. He served as the President of Haiti's interim ruling body, the National Council of Government, from February 7, 1986 to February 7, 1988. In February 1988, he was replaced by Leslie Manigat, elected President, who put him under arrest for insubordination. However, General Namphy's popularity and influence helped him to regain power in June 1988 where he remained until the September 1988 coup.

Namphy served as President of Haiti from June 20, 1988, but was deposed three months later on September 17, 1988 in a coup d'état when a group of non-commissioned officers in the Haitian Presidential Guard removed Namphy and brought General Prosper Avril to power. Earlier, in June 1988, Namphy overthrew Leslie Manigat in a coup d'état. Manigat was elected as President of Haiti in a tightly controlled military held election in January 1988. Following his deposition in the September coup, Namphy fled to the Dominican Republic and never returned to Haiti.

In 1986, when with the fall of his government, Jean-Claude Duvalier (appointed by his dying father as "President-for-Life") fled into exile in France with his family, Henri Namphy formed an interim government consisting six civilians and military members and promised elections and democratic reforms. However, his regime has been nicknamed as "Duvalierism without Duvalier". Namphy enjoyed the reputation of being honest and apolitical. As per his wish, he has been buried at the Cristo Redentor cemetery, Santo Domingo.

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Land Ownership of foreigner in Haiti during US Occupation of 1915

Land Ownership of foreigner in Haiti during US Occupation of 1915

In November 11, 1915, the Haitian President Sudre Dartiguenave was forced to sign a treaty with ratification by the Haitian Senate The document legitimized the US occupation and put Haitian finances and government under the control of the US for the next 20 years. The controversial amendment also aimed to disbanding the Haitian army and permit foreign land ownership that had been outlawed since the Haitian Revolution. However, the reluctant lawmakers rejected that notion and rather began drafting a new anti-American constitution, but under U.S pressure, that bill was kept undecided by President Dartiguenave till 1929. In 1929, a series of strikes and uprisings against the U.S initiated the withdrawal of U.S Marines from Haiti. In 1934, in concert with "Good Neighbor Policy" introduced by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, U.S Marine was officially withdrawn from Haiti except retaining fews for maintaining economic connections.

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Fabre Nicolas Geffrard Emigration Policy

Fabre Nicolas Geffrard Emigration Policy

During the government of Fabre Nicolas Geffrard, he encouraged the immigration of African-American, specially Catholic farmers from Louisiana who had familiarity with Vodou.

Between 1859 and 1860, an estimated 500 black Louisianans immigrated to Haiti. Geffrard appointed James Redpath to attract immigrants to the island

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Juneteenth Independence Day or Freedom Day

Juneteenth Independence Day or Freedom Day

Juneteenth is an American holiday that commemorates June 19, 1865, announcement of the abolition of slavery in the U.S. It is called Independence Day or Freedom Day. This was the day recognized as the emancipation of enslaved African-Americans throughout the former Confederacy of the southern United States.

President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on September 22, 1862, during the American Civil War, declaring that all enslaved people in the Confederate States of America in rebellion and not in Union hands were to be freed. The States that were not part of this agreement included: Kentucky, Maryland, Delaware, Missouri, West Virginia, the state of Tennessee, lower Louisiana, and Southeast Virginia.

The newly free slaves soon learned that their fight for freedom did not end with the Emancipation Proclamation. In the early 20th century, economic and political power led to a decline in Juneteenth. Later, between 1890 and 1908, all former Confederate states passed new constitutions or amendments that effectively disenfranchised black people and excluded them from the political process. It was during this period that the White-dominated state legislatures passed Jim Crow laws imposing second-class status. Then came the Great Depression that made many black people to leave the farms and to look toward the major cities in search of work. The Second Great Migration of Black Americans started during World War II, when many black people migrated to the West Coast where there were many job openings in the defense industry.

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Trump family separation Policy as Child crying for her parent

Trump family separation Policy as Child crying for her parent

Here is a picture of an immigrant child that appeared with audio recording in June 2018. This picture appeared to capture the voices of small Spanish-speaking children is crying out for her parents at a US immigration facility. This image had become a symbol of family separation by the Trump Administration.

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Midwife in Haiti

Midwife in Haiti

Here is the picture of a midwife who is offering care, dignity and a lifeline for a Haitian mother during childbirth.

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Plastic rivers flow through Haiti

Plastic rivers flow through Haiti

Here is a sad picture of a plastic river flowing through Haiti.
Plastic and foam food containers found everywhere in Haiti, clogging canals, cluttering streets and choking ocean wildlife
HaitianPhotos.Com

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Andy Bogdan Bindea trying to bring clean energy to Haiti

Andy Bogdan Bindea trying to bring clean energy to Haiti

Here is a picture of Romanian native Andy Bogdan Bindea as he is talking to several women in Haiti who were in the process of selling charcoal, He is in the process of bringing clean energy to Haiti with the help of his solar-power company. He has designed and installed solar-power systems in the D.C. region and Haiti.

Now he has a 10-year plan to bring affordable, renewable energy to two and a half million people in Haiti.

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Jovenel Moise to seek another 12 months TPS extension for Haitians

Jovenel Moise to seek another 12 months TPS extension for Haitians

Here is a picture of Haitian President Jovenel Moïse and his wife Martine Marie Etienne Joseph in Little Haiti Cultural Center in Miami during his first visit as president - Friday, June 16, 2017.

According to President Jovenel Moise: "We know an extension will terminate the 22nd of January 2018. But we are already prepared to seek another 12 months," he said. "I'm telling everyone who has TPS, calm down; know that you have a president who is working for you today."

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Washington, D.C. Attorney General, Haitian-American Karl Racine

Washington, D.C. Attorney General, Haitian-American Karl Racine

Here is a picture of Washington, D.C. Attorney General, Haitian-American Karl Racine.

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