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US Ambassador Pamela White with Laurent Lamothe

US Ambassador Pamela White with Laurent Lamothe

Prime Minister Laurent Lamothe participated in the US Independence day celebration at the residence of Pamela White - the US Ambassador to Haitian capital Port-au-Prince. In a speech during the celebration, Laurent Lamothe stated that it was his pleasure to participate in the event and that his presence during the event was the testimony of the fact that Haiti has an excellent relationship with United States. Stephanie Villedrouin, the Minister of Tourism was also present.

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Mole St. Nicholas as potential US naval base for Canal of Panama

Mole St. Nicholas as potential US naval base for Canal of Panama

Here is a picture of Môle St. Nicholas in Haiti as a strategic location as potential US naval base to protect Canal of Panama.

Ex-President Florvil Hyppolite, eager to have the might of the United States behind him during a trying period, began to have negotiations with Admiral Bancroft Gherardi, a negotiator appointed to represent US President, Benjamin Harrison, to talk about the US's acquisition of Môle St. Nicholas as a US naval base for the Panama Canal. At that period, the elevated limestone peninsula was thought to be impregnable, and the US, seeking a Caribbean site for their base, was eager to acquire the 5.5km piece of land. The deal fell through, however, as the sale would have been against the Haitian Constitution.

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U.S. Marines in Fort Liberte in 1916

U.S. Marines in Fort Liberte in 1916

Here is a picture of United States Marines during the occupation of Haiti in 1916. This picture was taken during a hunting operation of Caco.

The United States occupation of Haiti started July 28, 1915 during the government of U.S. President Woodrow Wilson and ended on August 1, 1934 during the government of Franklin D. Roosevelt

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German Threat Reason for U.S. Occupation in Haiti

German Threat Reason for U.S. Occupation in Haiti

The 1915 U.S. Occupation of Haiti started when militias, known as cacos, staged turf wars to seize power on the island. German immigrants had funded the cacos and now urged Germany to come and establish peace.

Germany threatened U.S. interests. In the summer of 1915, U.S. Occupation forces arrived and stayed until 1934.

U.S. improved Haiti's infrastructure, but Haitians resented the Occupation. Finally the Great Depression forced U.S. citizens to demand its government leave to save money.

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Cacoists and Germany Force U.S. Occupation

Cacoists and Germany Force U.S. Occupation

Haiti was failing as a country in 1915. Cacoists' militias were waging war in the streets, financed by German immigrants. News Germany might invade the island reached the U.S., and to prevent that, American warships invaded first, stopping anti-American cacoist leader, Rosalvo Bobo.

Until 1934 the U.S. ran the island with Haitian figurehead rulers. Haitians grew to resent the Occupation; they wanted Bobo in power.

Eventually due to the Great Depression in America, U.S. troops withdrew.

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Vice-President Joe Biden Greeting Haitian Activist Marleine Bastien

Vice-President Joe Biden Greeting Haitian Activist Marleine Bastien

Here is a picture of the U.S. Vice-President Joe Biden greeting Haitian activist Marleine Bastien during his visit to Little Haiti following the earthquake.

In April of 2010, In support to the Haitian community after the Haiti earthquake, Joe Biden visited the Haitian community in Little Haiti in Miami. He greeted the Haitian Activist Marleine Bastien and many others

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Haitian Diaspora

Haitian Diaspora

The Haitian population is actually estimated at more that 14 million. As of 2013, it was estimated that about 10 million Haitians were living in Haiti, with over 4 millions outside of the country.

can be found almost everywhere in the world. However, the majority of them can be found in the Dominican Republic, the Bahamas, The United States, Canada and France
The Haitian diaspora

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Haitian protest at US Embassy, Port-au-Prince

Haitian protest at US Embassy, Port-au-Prince

As the opposition is attempting to remove Michel Martelly from power, they scheduled a protest at the US Embassy in Port-au-Prince, Haiti on November 29, 2013. Prior to this protest, a successful protest took place on November 18 in Port-au-Prince and Cap-Haitian.

The purpose of this protest scheduled for November 29 is to demand that the American government help them in removing the current government from power

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American Ambassador Pamela Ann White

American Ambassador Pamela Ann White

Here is a picture of American Ambassador Pamela Ann White with Haitian president Michel Martelly.

An American diplomat born 1948 in Lewiston, Maine. Prior to her position in Haiti, in November 2010, she was named the United States Ambassador to The Gambia by President Barack Obama. Pamela Ann White was the second Maine woman to serve as a United States ambassador, with the first being Margaret Joy Tibbetts. In January 2012, she was appointed United States Ambassador to Haiti. Other positions include the Peace Corps in Cameroon from 1971-1973. Prior to her appointment as ambassador, White worked for the United States Agency for International Development beginning in 1978. With USAID, White served in Burkina Faso, Senegal and Haiti, Egypt and South Africa. From 1999-2001, she was the deputy director for East Africa.

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U.S. State Department issued new Travel Warning to Haiti

U.S. State Department issued new Travel Warning to Haiti

United States citizens wishing to travel to the Caribbean country of Haiti have been warned by the U.S. State Department to travel with more than just their sunscreen. In a recent release from the State Department, the high rate of crimes in Haiti, especially those against Americans, juxtaposed with the lack of reliable medical services such as ambulances and the limited scope of the protection offered by security forces, make the need for personable measures safeguarding individual safety necessary.

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