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Protest

Crowd asked for the return of Jean Bertrand Aristide from exile in South Africa

Crowd asked for the return of Jean Bertrand Aristide from exile in South Africa

Here is a picture of a supporter of Jean Bertrand Aristide demanding his return from exile in South Africa

Aristide Returned From Exile In South Africa

Haitian government delivered his diplomatic passport in the month before his return and in this context, the South African Cabinet Minister Collins Chabane had said, " if he wants to go we can't hold him hostage." People in the Haitian political circle were of opinion that any of the election winners could reverse his long awaited return. His return just before the election was not liked by the U.S.. Even at the last moment, they were exerting pressure on South Africa to delay his flight.

As a two time President, he was never able to complete his terms. The first time he was ousted from power in a coup, but restored later through a military intervention in 1994 and during the second time, a rebellion in 2004 forced him to escape from the country. Aristide was a former slum priest in his early life, very popular among the poor Caribbeans.

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Protest against Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Protest against Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Here is a picture of a protest during the government of Jean Bertrand Aristide

The Group of 184 was led by two of the country's most reviled multimillionaires. (1) Andy Apaid, Jr., a U.S. citizen and the owner of Haiti's largest sweatshops, and (2) Reginald Boulos, owner of a Haitian pharmaceutical firm whose products had killed dozens of poor Haitians. They both had good links with the influential media (ANMH). The G184, dominated by Haitian elites, was often criticized for two main reasons: (i) while selecting members from different sectors of civil society, the selection was dominated by the representation with one special interests, i.e., private sector business associations; and (ii) A vast array of other important civil society organizations were being ignored. Their experience, expertise and advice were not sought and utilized. Once G184 became synonymous to the Haitian proverb."Bourik travay, chwal galonnen" (the donkey does the work, the horse gets the profit).

Once it was alleged that, ten of its members (anti-Aristide) representing business communities who mainly control G184 and its projects, received a funding of $23 million from the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) to promote and encourage their businesses and Haiti's anti-Aristide movement.

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Group 184 and the protest against Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Group 184 and the protest against Jean-Bertrand Aristide

Here is a picture of a massive demonstration organized during Jean-Bertrand Aristide reign

Group Of 184 And The Protest Against Jean Bertrand Aristide

The Group of 184 (Groupe 184), although now defunct, had been the Haitian public voice as well as it was the best salesperson for Haiti. It was the most powerful coalition of "civil society" organizations during the lead up to the 2004 coup that successfully destabilized Haiti's elected government and deposed President Aristide. It consisted both individuals and organizations, arranged in thirteen sectors like cultural, urban neighborhood, private enterprise, labor and peasant unions, feminist, media, human rights, non-governmental organization, etc.,. They had an agenda against the largest corporations in Haiti--the owners of such corporations constituted less than 1% of the population but owned over 50% of the country's wealth.

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Haiti protesters destroying Michel Martelly Picture

Haiti protesters destroying Michel Martelly Picture

Haiti protesters destroying Michel Martelly Picture. Will he call for Elections in January 2015?

Michel Martelly has extended three invitations to opposition parties to meet and find a solution to the crisis. But the opposition has yet to agree to a joint meeting. Martelly went so far as to extend an invitation to the extremist party, Fanmi Lavalas, who regards the invitation as merely an extraneous piece of information.

The National Palace, anticipating there would be demonstration activity around the building, had the Haitian National Police put up barricades. Demonstrators held placards demanding democratic elections along with a new government, as well ordering the government to release incarcerated opposition activists.

At the center of the firestorm brewing as the year draws to a close, Martelly is promising he will call for elections at the beginning of the new year even if the electoral crisis is not breeched.

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Spray painting of Martelly and Lamothe Picture during Protest

Spray painting of Martelly and Lamothe Picture during Protest

Here is a group of people spraypainting a poster of Martelly and Lamothe during a Protest

Will Martelly call for Elections in January 2015?

Anti-government protestors, who gathered by the thousands in Port-au-Prince last Tuesday November 25th, demanded President Martelly step down. They say he is planning to rule as dictator once 2015 arrives. Protestors concerns are real for it is true Martelly has the option to rule by Presidential decree if elections are not held by January 12th. By that date the terms of Parliament members will run out, forcing a constitutional crisis.

So far state and municipal elections have been delayed three years. Haitians were set to go and cast ballots on October 26th, but a bloc of six senators in the National Assembly refused to pass an electoral law, declaring it unconstitutional.

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Protest in Croix-Hilaire, locality of Petit-Goave

Protest in Croix-Hilaire, locality of Petit-Goave

Here is a protest in Croix-Hilaire, locality of Petit-Goâve. The population is demanding more electricity.

Petit-Goâve Protestors Demand Electricity Now and Me Jean Alix Civil Fired

Petit-Goâve protestors are fed up in Croix-Hilaire. They have gone without electricity for six months, and are telling Electricity of Haiti either reconnect the transformer, or residents will set up barricades of burning tires on National Road #2.

Another protest, more peaceful, is being organized by Block of Democratic Opposition to order the government to immediately dismiss Petit Goâve Government Commissioner Me Jean Alix Civil and appoint a new municipal cartel.

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Anti Martelly Protest - November 18, 2013

Anti Martelly Protest - November 18, 2013

Here is a picture of the crowd that participated in the protest against the government of Michel Martelly on November 18, 2013. The opposition called the protest a success with the participation of several thousand of people in the street to demand the removal of president Michel Martelly

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A Car Window broken during Protest in Haiti

A Car Window broken during Protest in Haiti

Here is the picture of a car being damaged during a violent demonstration in Haiti.

Amidst the pandemonium of the protest that degenerated into stone-throwing, the property damage caused has yet to be estimated. The crowd followed a cavalcade of the government's as they moved through the towns of Port-au-Prince on October 26, 2014. Soon, the stone throwing began and the security forces retaliated with bullets and tear gas. Valuable property including a car window were apparently damaged in the melee, though the true extent of the damage is, as yet, untallied.

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Street Protester removing Sign of President Michel Martelly

Street Protester removing Sign of President Michel Martelly

Here is a picture of a Street Protester removing the picture of President Michel Martelly.

Anti-government protest in Haiti

The incident followed a series of other demonstrations in the weeks leading up to it, showing the dissatisfaction of a fraction of the population with the current administration. Despite the reports being made about the government's strides in improving the living conditions of the country's people, the protest accused them of just the opposite. The opposition further accused the government of far-flung corruption, for doing very little to ease poverty, and for the rising cost of living in the country.

As many of these charges are still flung at the Martelly Government one year later, it is no wonder the protesting, like that witnessed in late October 2014, continues. Added to those old charges is, of course, the new one of the purposeful delay of the long-awaited elections.

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Car set on Fire during Street Protest

Car set on Fire during Street Protest

Here is a picture of a private car being set on fire during a violent Street Protest in Haiti

Anti-government protest in Haiti has turned violent

It was a battle between bullets and stones in the country's capital of Port-au-Prince on Thursday November 7, 2013. The situation then was much like the recent incident in Petit Goave where political unrest led to a clash between protesters and the security forces.

Back in 2013, a peaceful procession of about 3,000 began marching in the morning through the towns of the capital. They were demanding that the country's leader, President Michel Martelly, resign his post, but were reportedly met with people who hurled stones at them from alleys and rooftops. This initial chaos led to a greater one still, as police intervened with the use of tear gas, but were met by the protesters throwing stones back at them. The entire melee ended only after the group of protesters fled to nearby Petion-ville.

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