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Limbe

Major road accident at Coupe a Limbe, North

Major road accident at Coupe a Limbe, North

Here is a picture of a Major road accident at Coupe à Limbé, in the North of the country.

On Friday night, May 6, 2016, in a major road accident in Coupe à Limbé (North) involving two trucks, resulted 12 deaths and many critically injured. According to the Directorate of Civil Protection (DPC) report, an overloaded truck carrying mostly "madan sara" and their merchandise, got overturned when it tried to avoid another truck broken down in the middle of the road. Ten people died on the spot. According to an assessment of the National Ambulance Centre (CAN), the number of deaths might be more, because some of the injured transported to the hospitals in Quartier Morin and Milot, were in critical conditions. Immediate rescue operation could not be started because of heavy rain.

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Hospital Bon Samaritain, Limbe

Hospital Bon Samaritain, Limbe

Hôpital Bon Samaritan (HBS) was founded in 1953 as a very basic Christian outpatient clinic and grew to be one of Haiti's principal health centers under the guidance of late William H. Hodges, MD. The hospital is a project under the Fondation HBS which is a non-profit organization partly sponsored by HBS Foundation Inc, Florida. The 130 bed facility of the hospital has above 90% annual occupancy rate.

The ever busy outpatient department of Hospital Bon Samaritain, Limbé is complemented with a full functional laboratory, pharmacy, radiology, maternity, pediatrics, adult ward and surgery. Normal routine treatments include: protein and vitamin malnutrition, thyroid, malaria, respiratory infection, eye infections, skin disorders, diabetes, tuberculosis, chronic heart failure, syphilis and other venereal diseases,

Contact: #1 Anciene Grande Rue, Limbe, Haiti; Phone 561 246 3360 ; E-mail hbsfl@att.net, & hbslimbe.org

Some additional Hospitals in Departement Nord:
Hospital Universitaire Justinien, Cap-Haïtien
Hospital Sacré Coeur, Milot - supported by the CRUDEM Foundation
Alyans Sante Borgne, Borgne

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Limbe Essential Factor in French Defeat

Limbe Essential Factor in French Defeat

Limbé's part in the struggle for Haiti's freedom from French rule is owing to its location. Situated in Limbé Valley, the embracing mountains gave the slaves living there a cloak of privacy, necessary to build their army without discovery.

Limbé slaves crossed the mountains to meet with other slaves residing below Limbé. They developed camaraderie with one another and used Limbé as a preparation area for their assault upon French forces.

They were successful in driving the French out of Cap-Haitien in 1803.

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Makendal was born in Limbe

Makendal was born in Limbe

Limbé Prepares Slaves to Overcome French

Limbé, French for limb, is an important part of Haiti's struggle for independence.

Limbé's location in a valley, bounded by mountains, protected the slaves living there from discovery as they hiked mountain paths to meet other slaves living below Limbé.

Meeting clandestinely, they built bonds of trust, which enabled them to form a rebel unit to defeat the French.

Limbé was the staging area for the rebel slaves before they engaged French forces in the Vertieres Battle and triumphed in 1803.

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Place Saint Pierre - Limbe

Place Saint Pierre - Limbe

The town of Limbé is an agricultural axis in the Arrondissement du Limbé. The Limbé River, which runs close by, has made the town second in stature behind Cap-Haitien.

Limbé is home to 32,200 occupants and sits north of Port-au-Prince. Its closest neighbors are the towns of Bas-Limbé, Port-Margot, Plaisance, Cap-Haitien, and L'Asul-du-Nord.

Limbé possesses two health-care facilities: Dispensaire St. Jean and Hôpital Bon-Samaritain. Its green cover surpasses most other towns, but soil erosion is still a problem.

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Musee de Guahaba - Limbe

Musee de Guahaba -  Limbe

The town of Limbé, part of Arrondissement du Limbé, played an integral part in Haiti's liberation.

Limbé's location in the Valley of Limbé sequestered the town from nearby areas. Its mountains offered protection to slaves engaged in a rebellion to free themselves from bondage.

Limbé slaves traversed mountain paths to secretly meet with slaves living below Limbé. They forged an alliance, which led to their defeat of the French in Cap-Haitien in 1803.

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Pre-Colonization Period in the City of Limbe

Pre-Colonization Period in the City of Limbe

Limbé Agent in French Defeat

Limbé played a role in Haiti's slave rebellion in the 1800s. Because it lay in the Limbé Valley, surrounded by mountains, slaves had access to other slaves past the Souffrieres River.

Able to travel on mountain paths to slaves living below Limbé, they formed bonds with each other, which prepared them to drive the French out of Cap-Haitien.

Limbé was the staging area for the Vertieres battle, in which slaves defeated the French forces in 1803, a year before Haiti's independence.

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Home from Colonial Period in Limbe

Home from Colonial Period in Limbe

In the Arrondissement du Limbé sits the town of Limbé, with 32,200 occupants. Limbé is sub-divided into seven partitions: Tanmas, Haut-Limbé, Souffrieres, Ravine-des-Roches, Simalo, Camp-Coq, and Plaisance.

Important to agricultural viability of Limbé is the Limbé River, which irrigates crops of bananas, mangoes, and other tropical fruits. Coffee farming and rice growing also occur.

Although deforestation has crippled much of Haiti, Limbé has more tree cover than most areas. But the Limbé River is at peril of drying up because of deforestation.

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Limbe River Victim of Deforestation

Limbe River Victim of Deforestation

Limbé, a town known for a healthy agricultural industry, is part of a dangerous trend, caused by vanishing tree cover. Large areas of barren ground suffer soil erosion when the rains come; and Limbé River's flow has slowed as a result.

Without Limbé River to help irrigate crops, more crops are failing, affecting the economy of Limbe's 32,200 residents.

Limbé still contains more tree cover than most of Haiti, but how long before more deforestation occurs?

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Missing Tree Cover Slows Limbe River's Flow

Missing Tree Cover Slows Limbe River's Flow

Limbé, once a thriving agricultural center, has fallen victim to the rampant deforestation in over 96-98% of Haiti. Limbé River, which runs near Limbé, has been an important resource for crop yields of tropical fruits, coffee, and rice.

But lack of tree cover has washed away rich topsoil and reduced Limbé River's flow. The problem is further aggravated by flash floods, which cause the river to overflow its banks and submerge the town during the storm season.

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